Litttle Rock Nine Essay

1577 words - 6 pages

Prejudices will always be prevalent in some way, shape, or form. If feelings of racial superiority are allowed to fester, eventually they can become strong enough to push people to radical actions. The Little Rock Nine is a group of nine African-American students who decided to make a stand and make a large step towards breaking down the walls of segregation. Despite evident opposition, their determination and fortitude set in motion a series of events that have accelerated the progress of integration within the United States. The lessons learned from those young children will forever be applicable to our lives in the past, present, and for what is to come.
In the town of Little Rock, Arkansas, nine African-American children from similar walks in life were bound together by destiny. They would embark on the hardest journey life could throw at them. They would be united together by one common goal, to be part of the NAACP’s plan to integrate the Little Rock Central High School and receive a high school education from school just like any other white person. They would face hatred and prejudice in its cruelest form. All these things can be depicted by the short video. However, by enduring these atrocities, these children would learn and teach lessons that will never be forgotten.
Melba Patillo Beals was one of the Little Rock Nine. Throughout her first semester at Little Rock Central High School, she was constantly harassed physically and verbally. She became numb to reality as the girl inside her was to afraid to face reality and she became a warrior. During one instance of being harassed, Melba remembered the words her mother said about not retaliating but saying thank you to the students harassing her. This idea of turning the other cheek seemed to Melba to be both irrational as well as illogical, but one day after being driven to desperation Melba tried it. Her attacker was unsure what to think, after “heaping coals of fire on his head”, he left confused. That day Melba learned by responding to her attackers with a simple thank you as well as saying a quick prayer to God was the best way to combat the situation.
Elizabeth Eckford was another one of the members of the Little Rock Nine. The most notable part of her participation in the integration of the Little Rock Central High School was the first day she walked to that school. That day can be remembered by the photographs taken. Elizabeth Eckford was walking to school alone that day; she was uninformed about the plan to meet with Daisy Bates because she lacked a telephone at her house. Proceeding with the normal plan, she walked to school, only to be engulfed by an angry white mob shown in the picture. Threats of death, lynching, and many other things were screamed at her. In shock, Elizabeth continued on her way until she found a seat next to a reporter. By looking at the situation in which she was placed, it is incredible to see the level of hostility that the people showed toward her....

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