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Living In The 1600 And 1700s

696 words - 3 pages

Several people who live today have distaste for manual labor, such as farming, making crafts, laundry, or cleaning. However, all of these tasks were included in the list of daily chores for colonial children. While some detest tiring work, others cannot stand boredom. No matter how tired you were, you would still have to go to church once or twice a day on the Sabbath. The only way to get out of work would be getting sick. Because the colonists’ only medicine was from plants, the chances of dying or being scarred for life were high. If living the 1600s and 1700s could be described in one word, it would be tiresome. After all, diseases were as common as air, everyday was spent working or at least being productive in some way, and if there was time for a respite, it would be on the Sabbath, a day dedicated to God.

Diseases were common and widespread in the colonies. Countless times, epidemics have struck everywhere, from major cities to small countryside. Characterized by horrid rashes, smallpox was a despised disease that existed throughout history and throughout the colonies. If you beat the 30% chance of dying, you would still be physically scarred and possibly blinded or crippled. Yellow fever, carried by mosquitoes, attacked the southern colonies. If someone got inflicted with this disease, they would suffer from jaundice, vomiting, various aches, and fevers. Although this disease spread far and killed many, if you survived, you would be immune it for the rest of your life. Throughout the 1700s to 1800s, epidemics of measles, a disease considered worse than smallpox, struck the colonies. In the beginning, what seems likes allergies will eventually turn into a severe red rash. Although it is not likely that you will die, measles is highly contagious and can easily spread. There were even more diseases and epidemics besides the ones mentioned in this essay. If it were possible to list each one in detail, it would take far too long to finish this essay.


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