Lord of the Flies: The Innate Evil

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When Ralph sees the naval officer that appears on the island to save them, he realizes that he will return to civilization. The shock causes him to reflect on what has happened. The rescue does not produce joy; instead he feels despair at what he has been through. He is awakened to the reality that he will never be the same. He has lost his innocence and learned about the evil that lurks within himself and all men through his experiences on the island. Ralph’s revelation to his loss of innocence and societal order among the boys is exemplified through the collapse of the attempted Democratic government, the killing of the pig, and the death of Piggy and Simon.
At the beginning of the novel, Ralph and Piggy discover a conch shell on the beach and use it to summon the boys together after the crash separates them. The conch shell becomes a symbol of civilization and order in the novel. The shell initially is a successful way of governing the boys’ meetings, following simple etiquette—whoever is holding the shell has the right to speak. The shell acts as more than a symbol, it is a tool that provides political legitimacy to the group of stranded boys. As the island civilization erodes and the boys descend into savagery, the conch shell loses its power and influence among them. The most important symbol of the shell is when Roger rolls a boulder onto Piggy and the conch shell as well. The first murder and the demise of the conch signify the end of the civilized instinct among the boys on the island.
Because they have been away from organized society for such a long time, the boys of the island slowly morph into Golding's view of mankind’s innate vile, destructive nature. The assertion is best illustrated through...

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