Lord Of The Flies And Hitler’s Nazi Regime

1280 words - 5 pages

The 1954 novel Lord of the Flies by William Golding won the 1983 Nobel Prize for Literature and the novels allegorical nature has earned it positions in the “Modern Library 100 Best Novels, reaching number 41 on the editor's list, and 25 on the reader's list” (Lord of the Flies: Background). Golding’s thought provoking novel was written and published as the world was still remembering the horrors of the Second World War and many parts and components of the novel can be related to the Second World War, specifically Adolf Hitler and his Nazi Regime. Many comparisons can be made between Lord of the Flies and the events that occurred in Adolf Hitler’s Nazi Regime. The group of choir boys bossed by Jack Merridew can be compared to the brutal and intimidating Nazi police force the Gestapo. The character Jack Merridew himself can be compared to the father of Nazi Germany Adolf Hitler because both gained support through using fear. Dehumanization is also present in the form of young Piggy and the Jewish People is Lord of the Flies and Hitler's Nazi regime respectively.
Lord of the Flies features a group of former choir boys more commonly know as the hunters and this group of boys have much in common and shared many tactics with Hitler’s Gestapo police force. The Hunters in The Lord of the Flies used violence as a way to intimidate younger boys into thinking that they should be afraid of themselves and Jack. “Roger let the way straight through the castles, kicking them over, burying the flowers, scattering the chosen stones.” (Golding 62). Roger is a member of the Hunters and can be compared to a member of the Gestapo, he is using his strength and age as a way to use violence to assert power of the littluns. Roger intimidated the littluns by destroying their hard work with a grin on his face. Roger and the other Hunters are comparable to the real life Gestapo. “The favorite sport of the Gestapo guards is to force non-Jewish prisoners to punch the faces of the Jewish prisoners,” the eye-witness writes. “Jewish new-comers are forced to sleep during the first two weeks of their confinement in a cupboard containing two pails which serve as an improvised lavatory.” (Gestapo Torture). The violent horror stories that came out of Gestapo ran prisons evoked fear in the German people. The stories of violence from Gestapo that terrified the German people can be compared to how the Hunters evoke fear in the Littluns. A parallel can be seen between the Hunters and the Gestapo use the tactic of intimidation. Many other events can be compared between The Lord of the Flies and the Nazi Regime.
Leaders throughout history have used fear to gain political status, weather it politicians scaring the public with economic warnings or chiefs encouraging the thought of a beast. In both Lord of the Flies and Hitler’s Nazi Germany leaders gained political support through pumping fear though its people’s veins. Jack Merridew plays on the stranded boys fear of a beast in the...

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