Main Themes In To Kill A Mockingbird By Harper Lee

883 words - 4 pages

In every story, there are themes that point out the meaning of the story so it does not leave the reader hanging. So what is a theme? A theme is a fundamental and often universal idea explored in a literary work. In the book, To Kill a Mockingbird, there are three main themes, which commonly appear throughout the story. These themes will help tie any lose ends in the story, and help readers to understand the meaning of this story.
The first theme is the coexistence of good and evil throughout the story. The way the book shows the moral nature of people, essentially their good and bad sides. The book further promotes this theme by using the transformation of Scout and Jem view of childhood innocence, in which they believe that everybody is good, because they have never been exposed to evil, to a more adult view, in which they have been exposed to many types of evil and have to apply it to their thinking. An important subtheme of this book involves the danger that, hatred, prejudice, and ignorance pose to many innocent people. The people in the book affected by this are Boo Radley and Tom Robinson. These two are unprepared for the evil they were exposed and as a result they were mentally destroyed. Jem is also experiences the same affect when he discovers the evil of racism, in which his faith in justice and humanity is lost. However, Scout retains her faith in justice and humanity, because the case had no effect on her. In this book, the voice of morality is Atticus Finch, who already experiences and understands evil, but does not lose faith in humanity’s capacity to be good. He understands that everybody basically has both good and bad qualities, but it is more important to appreciate the good ones. The view of the world is the exact same as the view Scout has taken in, and at a young age she already understands this form of moral judgment. As a result she sees Boo Radley as a human being other than viewing him as a dark and weird “thing”. Scout’s new ability to view the world from this view ensures that she will never be marred the world around her as she loses her innocence. Scout’s ability to cope with the evil in the world shows that no matter how much evil is in the world, there will be people who are able to only look at the bright side of life.
The second theme in the book, To Kill a Mockingbird, is the importance of being morally educated. Throughout the book the theme of the importance to morally educate children repeats constantly, because the book moral questions are focused upon the...

Find Another Essay On Main Themes in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

1783 words - 7 pages . In addition to the setting, characters in To Kill a Mockingbird were also influenced by characters in Lee’s life. Many of the characters in Harper Lee’s most famous novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, were influenced by people she had known throughout her life. Scout, the main character, resembles Lee, as both were tomboys during their childhood. Scout’s last name, Finch, was also Lee’s mother’s maiden name. Scout’s mother died when she was a baby

To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee

1031 words - 4 pages To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee is a fascinating story that has captured the hearts of many readers. The main character and narrator Scout Finch, or otherwise known as Jean Louise Finch, speaks the voice of a young girl who grows up in a small town called Maycomb County in the 1930’s. Her father, Atticus Finch, is a non-racist lawyer in a very prejudice town. Throughout the novel, Harper Lee includes many themes, but one of the most

"To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee

1955 words - 8 pages such a sin because they don't do anything but sing music for people to enjoy. The mockingbird symbol happened to also support one of the themes of this book. The theme of it is prejudice exists deeply in the hearts of men, and often it takes over one's conscience to the point where the person would do anything to eradicate the target of their prejudice.In To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee's style contributed to the realism of the setting and story

To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee

649 words - 3 pages that this is a remedy that Harper Lee offers on the subject of dealing with everyday injustice. Instead of getting angry when someone puts us down, we should react by laughing along with the person or even just walking away. These reactions may douse the person's sprit to criticize you and end the tormentingAnother issue of injustice confronted in To Kill A Mockingbird is that of religious injustice. When Jem and Scout attend church with

"To Kill A Mockingbird" by Harper Lee

1590 words - 6 pages In the novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee makes a thematic statement on the prejudices and racism in modern society. Prejudice is defined as a preconceived judgment or opinion towards an object, person, or race. In To Kill a Mockingbird, the harsh realities of the 1930s - and the segregation of Black from White - are powerfully expressed by a few primary "mockingbirds" and an idol propagator of prejudice. Although Arthur Radley and Tom

To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee

1277 words - 5 pages Life Lessons Throughout their lives, individuals learn many valuable lessons that help them to grow and mature as human beings. This is evident numerous times throughout Harper Lee’s fictional novel To Kill a Mockingbird. Individuals in this novel learn these amazing lessons through Atticus Finch’s extraordinary teachings of morals. Atticus goes on to further teach valuable lessons of courage. Lastly, Atticus continues to teach valuable

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

1421 words - 6 pages The Innocence Within Thoughts are like seeds that take root in our minds. They spawn feelings and more thoughts that can have powerful consequences. In the novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee, the views of the townspeople in the 1930’s Southern town of Maycomb greatly impact the lives of two innocent men. The people make false accusations against Tom Robinson and Arthur “Boo” Radley because they are different. These characters are

"To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee

726 words - 3 pages Harper Lee wrote To Kill a Mockingbird. Harper Lee tells the story of her childhood in the 1930's in this novel. She makes up fictitious characters to provide the privacy of her hometown and people. In the novel To Kill a Mockingbird Scout is the main character and Harper Lee's fictitious name. The reader watches Scout mature throughout the book in a number of different ways. Scout gains a lot of maturity when she goes to school for her first

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

2186 words - 9 pages To Kill a Mockingbird To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee seems like a complete replica of the lives of people living in a small Southern U.S. town. The themes expressed in this novel are as relevant today as when this novel was written, and also the most significant literary devices used by Lee. The novel brings forward many important themes, such as the importance of education, recognition of inner courage, and the misfortunes of prejudice

To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee

589 words - 2 pages ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ is a novel written by Harper Lee. It is set during the early 20th Century in the fictional town of Maycomb. Lee has decided to write the novel from a child’s point of view because a child is innocent but as the novel progresses the narrator, Scout, loses her innocence as she deals with the complications of her father being a lawyer. The novel revolves around racism and Scout sees discrimination wherever she goes whether

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

1137 words - 5 pages To Kill A Mockingbird Courage, the mental or morale strength to venture, persevere, and withstand danger, fear, or difficulty, is displayed in many different ways throughout Harper Lee¹s only published novel, To Kill A Mockingbird. To some, the courage manifested by the characters in this book is either offensive, or frivolous, but to those who realize the true meaning of this word, the fortitude and bravery exhibited by certain individuals

Similar Essays

Major Themes In To Kill A Mockingbird By Harper Lee

1270 words - 6 pages Introduction To kill a mockingbird by Harper Lee takes place in Maycomb, Alabama in 1903. This novel is basically a coming of age story for a young girl named Scout and her older brother named Jem. Who grows up in a time where racism is normal. They soon learn to stand up for what is right, just like their dad, Atticus. The Coexistence of Good and Evil The most important theme of To Kill a Mockingbird is the Coexistence of good and evil. The

The Themes In "To Kill A Mockingbird" By Harper Lee

1116 words - 4 pages The novel To Kill a Mockingbird succeeds in portraying the lifestyle of a relaxed southern town in theearly 20th century. It shows the families, feelings, and bigotry of the time. There are three main themes in the novel,which are: justice is not blind, mob rule is not the way to solve things, and that you shouldn't fear or resentsomething that hasn't done anything to disturb life. These themes are true in the novel and are also true in

Themes In To Kill A Mockingbird, By Harper Lee

655 words - 3 pages To kill a mockingbird written by Harper Lee. Themes are the subject of a talk, a piece of writing or a person's thoughts. There are many themes present in this great American classic such as courage, racism, prejudice, morality and of course coming of age. Lee communicates these themes with characters, events that unfold and the scenarios that Jem and Scout have to face. One of many themes that is evidently present throughout the book is

Common Themes In To Kill A Mockingbird By Harper Lee

870 words - 4 pages The death of a black man, the attack of two children, and a man locked up for so long he cannot remember what life was like before all seem unrelated, however they are not. They are all examples of a common theme throughout the book To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, victims of what a main character implores his kids not to do. In To Kill a Mockingbird, two plotlines coincide; two children, Scout and Jem Finch are growing up with a