This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Major Federal Anti Trusth Laws In The United States

972 words - 4 pages

The anti-trust laws were set in place to promote vigorous competition but also to protect the consumer from unfair mergers and business practices. The first antitrust law that was passed by Congress is called the Sherman Act and is a “comprehensive charter of economic liberty aimed at preserving free and unfettered competition as the rule of trade” according to www.FTC.gov . Later in 1914 Congress passed two more laws, one creating the Federal Trade Commission Act (FTCA) and then the Clayton Act, which now create the three core federal antitrust laws that are still active currently. Although they have changed over the last hundred years, they still have the same concept: “to protect the ...view middle of the document...

This is just one example of many where the Clayton Act was used to minimize the monopoly of one product.
The last antitrust law is the Federal Trade Commission Act (FTCA) that also does not carry any criminal penalties although it did create the Federal Trade Commission to monitor possible violators of this act. .
I believe that the Sherman Act, Clayton Act and antitrust laws that are in place are effective because of the lawsuits that have taken place due to companies breaking the laws. My first example regarding how the laws are effective is the case of Certegy Check Services, Inc.’s lawsuit in 2013. “Certegy is one of the nation’s largest check authorization service companies” (Katz, Mitchell 2013) in our nation based in St. Petersburg, Fl. The company helps retail merchants determine whether or not to accept the consumers check. The consumers are allowed to dispute the information that Certegy may have that is incorrect due to the fact that this has a huge impact on their life, determining their eligibility to get credit cards or pay for services such as cell phones. The complaint that was filed against Certegy stated that the company “did not follow proper dispute procedures among other allegations” as stated by Katz, Mitchell in his article on the lawsuit. The company violated FCRA by not creating a process that allows the consumers to obtain their free annual reports, which everyone is entitled to. They also did not establish and implement policies and procedures that relate to the correctness of the information that it sends to the other reporting agencies. Certegy paid the $3.5 million fine, which is the highest fine in the country to...

Find Another Essay On Major Federal Anti-trusth Laws in the United States

How The Federal Reserve System Works In The United States

1172 words - 5 pages selective in judging the creditworthiness of business applications for loans. Conversely, when interest rates decline, money is called "easy", meaning that it is not only cheaper but also easier to borrow.Although changes in the discount rate can be used as a major means of controlling the money supply and are used to control it in some countries, they are nit used for this purpose in the United States. The Federal Reserve Board does not allow banks to

The Debate on Abortion Laws in the United States

1562 words - 7 pages can be neutral or on the other party’s side for certain topics. Abortion is a very controversial topic as it always has been all around the country but more specifically in the United States. There are two sides to the debate those who believe abortion should be legal and their organization is known as prochoice. On the other side there are the group of people who believe that abortion should not be legal and reverse the laws from what they are

Inadequate Same Sex Marriage Laws in the United States

944 words - 4 pages Inadequate Same Sex Marriage Laws in the United States The institution of marriage has been around for many years. Times have changed and society has grown as a whole. The United States has laws that prohibit same-sex marriages or do not grant them the same privileges as "traditional" marriages. You will see how behind this great nation has remained. As many countries around the world explore less traditional ways of life, the United

Origins of Marijuana Laws in The United States

1151 words - 5 pages make exceptions for medical and industrial uses, however it placed quite heavy excise taxes on this, which effectively killed the commercial hemp industry in the United States. Anslinger's campaign against marijuana received a tremendous amount of support from William Randolph Hearst. He controlled a sizable publishing empire that included 28 newspapers, 18 magazines, and several radio stations and movie companies. He was an outspoken racist

Importance of Voter ID Laws in the United States

1384 words - 6 pages will require people to present a government issued photo ID before they are allowed to vote, which is great because most people don’t know how easy it is to submit a ballot in another person’s name. In some of the states that don’t require a photo ID to vote all you have to do is state the other person’s name and the poll worker will check the name off and they will ask you to sign next to the name and then you are able to vote. Voter ID laws will

The Role of the Federal Reserve in the United States Economy

1480 words - 6 pages In this essay I will discuss the role of the Federal Reserve in the United States economy. In doing this I will look first at open market operations as a tool to influence money supply. Then, I will look at discount rate and federal funds target rate and how the Federal Reserve uses it to influence money supply. Lastly, I will look at required reserve ratio and  deposit expansion (money) multiplier as a tool the Federal Reserve uses to influence

The Federal Government's Effect on Renewable Energy in the United States

4386 words - 18 pages The Federal Government's Effect on Renewable Energy in the United States In an article posted by Reuters on October 24, 2006, the global conservation group, formerly known as the WWF, stated that “humans are stripping nature at an unprecedented rate and will need two planets' worth of natural resources every year by 2050 on current trends” (Blanchard). The report indicates that, if every other country were to use the same amount of

The United States Treasury and The Federal Reserve

2009 words - 8 pages are unique, maybe you have. And I am prepared to give you the answers.The Federal Reserve is the central bank in the United States. A central bank is a bank that manages a countries (in this case the United States) money supply, state currency, and interest rates. The U . S . Congress established three key objectives for monetary policy in the Federal Reserve Act: Maximum employment, stable prices, and moderate long-term interest rates. The first

Medicare: A Major Health Policy in United States

1466 words - 6 pages Financial liability associated with illness is a huge burden which can result in lack in proper medical care. Only half of old age people had health insurance. The U.S. Federal government initiated a social Insurance Program, one of its most significant success stories called MEDICARE to meet its objectives of providing affordable healthcare. Its objectives included ( i) to create awareness about the financial risk associated with

Should The United States Have Stricter Handgun Control Laws?

1727 words - 7 pages . There are many countries throughout the world and the U.S. that have laws regulating ownership, sale, and production of firearms. There are 41 out of 50 states that have state gun laws, 20,000 in the U.S. altogether. There are many different factors that can influence the effect of gun laws on crime and deaths like local traditions, density of population, psychological and sociological pressure and many others. For example just in the state we

Major Policy of the George W. Bush United States

1903 words - 8 pages the diseases. Later on, this initiative would be reauthorized by the Tom Lantos and Henry J. Hyde United States Global Leadership Against HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria Reauthorization Act of 2008. Even after Bush, combating HIV/AIDS worldwide continued to be a cornerstone of U.S. global health efforts (“Emergency Plan”). Also in May of 2003, President Bush would sign the Jobs and Growth Tax Relief Reconciliation Act. One of the major

Similar Essays

Gun Laws In The United States

1306 words - 6 pages Access to guns in the United States (US) is too easy and the laws governing access should be strengthened. Current US gun laws are very permissive, which has led to excessive gun-related violence and deaths. Guns are one of the leading causes of violence in the US at the moment, and access to guns (legally and illegally) is very easy. Currently, there are ~211 million firearms in circulation and 70 million are handguns. (1) Today, there is at

Reform Immigration Laws In The United States

1436 words - 6 pages Current status of immigration in this country is totally out of control. Current immigration laws are not being enforced properly, borders are not fully protected and as a result the quality of life has negatively impacted the United States. In the 1980’s, there were 9,000 illegal immigrants that were imprisoned in the federal and state prisons, which currently is overloaded. Today, 352,000 are in prison under overcrowding conditions. Of these

Voter Id Laws In The United States

1600 words - 7 pages Voter ID laws in the United States have begun to create controversy since the beginning of its adaptations in the early 2000’s. Voter ID laws in the United States is a law that requires U.S. citizens to have a special form of identification in order to vote in an election. The idea with Voter ID laws is that the state must make sure that the laws do not pose any sort of burden on the voters. These laws have been proposed in order to stop voting

Divorce Laws In The United States

1972 words - 8 pages decreasing. They only seem to be increasing as time goes on. If two people can no longer find it in themselves to be passionate towards one another and they no longer desire the others company, they should end their marriage. However, the growing number of divorces is proving that getting a divorce in the United States is too easy. The evidence proves that divorce laws should be made stricter throughout the United States. Every divorce is