Malawi Essay

2211 words - 9 pages

Malawi

Malawi is a landlocked nation in the east Africa; it is boarded by
Tanzania to the north and Zambia on the North West, it is therefore
found below the brant line in the southern hemisphere, subsequently
showing that it’s an LEDC however there are many areas in Malawi that
are LLEDC. Malawi is classed as one of the poorest country in the
world having low numbers of economic development with an annual income
per person of only US$170. The vast majority of the population live in
the rural areas as there are only 14% of urban areas in Malawi. Malawi
is an example of an area with low levels of development and large
rural areas and therefore relies on agriculture for its economic
growth. The table below shows the relationship between low levels of
development and large rural areas.

Country

GNI/Capita (Wealth)

Urban

Rural

UK

22,220

89%

11%

USA

31,910

77%

22%

Ethiopia

620

16%

84%

Rwanda

880

6%

94%

This table confirms that there is a strong correlation between low
levels of development and large percentage of rural areas; it shows
that countries with large rural areas tend to be economically poor and
vice versa.

Malawi as a country has faced several problems in developing, due to
the factors stated below:

* Lack of infrastructure including weak communication links and poor
telecommunications

* Lack of industrialisation

* Population issues

* Rural deprivation

* Health issues e.g. aids

This essay will cover Malawi as a case study and discuss the factors
that may hinder the development of rural areas in LEDCs.

PHYSICAL/ ENVIRONMENTAL

Malawi is situated in east Africa. It is bordered by Tanzania
to the north, Zambia on the north-west, and Mozambique on the east,
south, and west. Malawi lies within the Great African Rift Valley
system. On the east side of the country is Lake Malawi, the twelfth
largest freshwater lake in the world. The lake is 568 km long and
about 1,500 ft above sea level. It is the main tourist attraction in
the country and is set among rolling hills. Malawi’s terrain and
climate are extremely varied. It differs from cool in the highlands to
warm around Lake Malawi with land from 35 m to over 3000m including
low plains, rolling hills and mountains. The rainfall is very high in
winter months (May to July) and very low in the summer months with
temperatures that are very high encouraging high rates of
evapro-transpiration and consequently very dry soil and a low water
table. In some occasions there have been serials of droughts and soil
moisture deficit. These conditions are not conductive to plant growth
and in winter there’s high input of rain in some conditions causing
flooding. These tropical and sub-tropical climatic...

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