This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Man's Evil Nature In Lord Of The Flies By Golding

834 words - 3 pages

When young boys are abandoned on an uninhabited island without adults, even they are capable of murder. This is the scenario depicted in the British author, William Goldings novel, Lord of the Flies, written and published in 1954 during World War 2. Comparing the characters of Jack, Ralph, Piggy and Simon with Freud's theory of id, ego and superego, one can prove that man has an underlying evil nature. The characters are represented with Jack as id, Ralph as ego, and Piggy and Simon as superego.Freud's theory of id, ego and superego influences the spheres of ones being. The id represents violence, and the drive to kill. The id is the desire to hurt others, and to dominate. In contrast the ego persuades one to make actions that make one's actions acceptable by others around them. It also controls the need for acceptance and the need to be in control. Though different, the superego lies within one's spirituality and need for order. It values rules, and commandments.Jack as id, represents the carnal drives in man. He illustrates this through painting his face. By painting his face, Jack suppresses his ego and superego, causing Jack to be capable of acts of violence without having any repercussions. Jack portrays this violence in different ways. First, Jack enjoys hunting because he gets to kill pigs. Often, in Lord of the Flies, Jack is consumed by killing pigs, and desires nothing more. The drive to kill rules his thoughts. In Jacks statement ''We're strong-we hunt! If there's a beast we'll hunt it down. We'll close in and beat and beat and beat-''(83), he demonstrates his carnal desire to hint and kill. Next, Jack also strove to control others. He would even resort to torture, ''What d' you mean by it, eh?' said the chief (Jack) forcefully 'What d' you mean coming with spears? What d' you mean by not joining my tribe?' The prodding became rhythmic. Sam yelled.'(166). The desire to kill is what proves that Jack has an evil nature, and the fact that he came from a civilized society shows that anyone can become like him.Ralph displayed himself as being ego through his need for acceptance and his leadership. Ralph's need for acceptance is so strong that he would even go as far as to insult an other so all the boys would like him, and see him as fitting in. An example of this is when Ralph...

Find Another Essay On Man's Evil Nature in Lord of the Flies by Golding

The Good and The Evil In The Lord of The Flies by William Golding

870 words - 4 pages . Everything can be used for good or for evil. A pie can be made for eating, or it can be thrown at someone's face. The conch used to bring people together or to achieve power. The fire to bring rescue or to hunt and kill. The island, to bring out inner savagery or to be used as refuge. It is important that people use items for good and not for evil so that the world stays a good place. Works Cited Golding, William. Lord of the Flies. London: Faber and Faber, 1954. Print.

Evil in Humanity in Lord of the Flies by William Golding

1098 words - 4 pages In the book Lord of the Flies by William Golding, a group of young boys from England are evacuated out of their country due to a war. The plane is then shot down and results into a plane crash on a deserted island. The boys are left all alone with no adults, no supplies, and no one to come and rescue them. They are all on their own and have to establish a new “society”. The boys have to choose someone to govern them and that person ends up

Innate Evil in The Lord of the Flies by WIlliam Golding

816 words - 4 pages “Humankind seems to have enormous capacity for savagery, for brutality, for lack of empathy, for lack of compassion” (Lennox). William Golding and Annie Lennox’s have the same view of society, innate human evil. In the fictional novel, Lord of the Flies, by William Golding, his view on humanity is innate human evil. Golding shows this as the characters Roger and Jack progress in the novel, and when the civilized society breaks. The first time

Evil and Primitivism in Man. Essay on "Lord of the Flies" by Golding

1265 words - 5 pages home. O god I want to go home.' But Piggy was there to help him out of his slump for a bit. But when Piggy is killed, Ralph is helpless and desperate. He is alone and it seems that Ralph's common sense has entirely been defeated.There is a running theme in William Golding's Lord of the Flies. Man is savage at heart, this is shown by Ralph in the pig hunt, and always ultimately reverting back to an evil and primitive nature. This is all shown by

Lord of the Flies by William Golding

1690 words - 7 pages sometimes hard to believe that the decisions being made are being made by children not adults. William Golding said that World War II taught him that "Man produces evil as a bee produces honey" also that it revealed to him the "innate depravity" of human nature(Stade). There is no doubt in my mind that these quotes are directly related to the mindset needed to write such a dark and graphic story as Lord of the Flies. Lord of the Flies may be about

Lord of the Flies by William Golding

1762 words - 8 pages Lord of the Flies by William Golding is a fictional novel highlighting natural characteristics of man kind. The Book was created during the post World War II period. Before creating this novel, William had experience in the navy where he learned of the nature of mankind. The introduction of the book portrays a plane crash where a large group of boys are stranded on an island. Here they grow in character and human instincts

Lord of the Flies by William Golding

962 words - 4 pages prospects in Lord of the Flies make the reader interpret the clues into Golding foresight and consider the ideas put forward. Simon was the character most in touch with nature, who, as a lover of beauty was represented as a philosopher, prophet and visionary. When all was bad Simon saw good, which we can see makes him the parallel to Jesus. Both Simon and Jesus spent their last night alive on top of a mountain, and both turned away from evil. Simon

Lord of the Flies by William Golding

1322 words - 5 pages prominent symbols used by Golding. In “Lord of the Flies” there are so many different examples of symbolism that could make the reader believe that the novel actually contains two totally different stories, the literal story, and the symbolic story. Before the reader even opens the book they are unknowingly presented with a major symbol in the novel; the title. "Lord of the flies" can be translasted to "Ba'alzevuv" (Hebrew,) or "Beelzebub" (Greek

"Lord Of the Flies" by William Golding

1661 words - 7 pages gladly welcomes his new way of life that consists of ruling by power. Jack suppresses his civilized instincts and lets his barbaric side run amuck. Golding uses this story to express his opinions on humanity, the human mind, and how we work in society. Golding suggests that this inherent sense of evil is a part of society that all humans have. Through Lord of the Flies, Golding implies that man will do whatever it takes and adjusts accordingly

Lord of the Flies by Golding

1479 words - 6 pages Lord of the Flies by Golding In "Lord of the Flies", Golding suggests that once man is freed from social conditioning and obligation, the intrinsic sense of evil will be revealed in him. He destroys the optimistic view of human nature by showing how even the most innocent of all - children can deteriorate into primitive savages once freed from the trappings of society. This view, that man is capable of gross

Lord of the Flies by William Golding - 1029 words

1029 words - 4 pages is no structure or laws to abide by; man is amoral, brutal, and bad in general. We need structure and government in our lives and society in order to tame this nature and protect us from our fellow counterparts. With the use of representative characters and religious references Golding portrays Hobbes’ belief in the Leviathan. We must know the true nature of ourselves in order to govern ourselves better and a society full of structure and laws. 1Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan (England, 1651). 22 Kings 1:2-3 (ARV) Works Cited Golding, William. Lord of the Flies. New York: Penguin Group, 1954. Hobbes, Thomas. Leviathan. England, 1651.

Similar Essays

Man's Innate Evil Lord Of The Flies By William Golding

923 words - 4 pages above examples conclude that aspects of human nature in the world alter us to our possibility to descend from law and order to chaos, good to evil and civilization to savagery. Lord of the Flies showed that the evil residing within everyone could be unleashed. It proved the dark side of human nature could be really brutal and even the most innocent of us are vulnerable to it.Bibliography"Lord of the Flies", William Golding, The Berkley Publishing Group, New York, 1954

Inner Evil In Lord Of The Flies By William Golding

793 words - 4 pages use the beast to corroborate their acts of violence, yet there is no external beast, nonetheless relating back to Golding ideal of inner evil. Golding conveys the beast’s identity through the literal actions of Jack and his tribe of boys, in which there actions define Golding's opinion. From timid British school boys, Jack and his tribe of savages try to please the beast with an offering, a pigs head also know as the “Lord of the Flies”. The fear

Human Nature In Lord Of The Flies By William Golding

3222 words - 13 pages wrong place at the wrong time. The majority of children on the island have no complaint of Simon. Of the main characters, he is the only one without a source of evil in him. The society starts to fall apart after his death, and this shows how incredibly critical Simon was in this novel. Without a presence of total good, a sense of civilization will collapse as shown here. Even when Simon is tempted by the Lord of the Flies, he persevered by

'lord Of The Flies' By William Golding: The Evil Of Human Nature

841 words - 3 pages the inability of the leader, Ralph, to enforce the rules he had made."Lord of the Flies" confirms that, in the opinion of the author, human nature is fundamentally evil and the rule of law, and its enforcement, is absolutely essential in order to create a peaceful and civilized society.