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Manifest Destiny Was A Movement Which Inspired Many Americans. It

801 words - 3 pages

Manifest Destiny was a movement which inspired many Americans. It is believed that Manifest Destiny's systematic body of concepts and beliefs empowered American life and American cultures. This movement had many ups and downs and even some religious influences. Manifest Destiny was also looked at from many view points and opinions.The idea of Manifest Destiny is as old as America itself. The philosophy sailed with Christopher Columbus across the Atlantic. It resides in the spirits of the Jamestown colonist and it landed at Plymouth Rock with the Pilgrims. It also traveled with the fire and brimstone preachers during the Great Awakening and built the first national road. Throughout history there are numerous examples of Manifest Destiny.Although the movement was named in 1845, the philosophy behind Manifest Destiny always existed through American History. One example is Andrew Jackson, who in 1818, was taking a broad interpretation of vague instructions from President Monroe, and led military forces into the Floridas during the Florida crisis. As a result he punished the Seminal Indians for taking up arms with the Spanish. He destroyed Spanish Forces, and captured several cities and forts in an orderly yet careless and ruthless fashion.The reason why Americans where in Florida in the first place, is yet another example of Manifest Destiny. The people of the deep south, wanting more fertile land, exercise what they consider to be their right. The planter class, without any political approval or permission, just took over and started settling and planting the Florida Pg. 2 territories. This move was an example of the arrogance that the Americans had towards expansion. Americans believed that they had a right to any land they wanted. First used in 1845, the term Manifest Destiny conveyed the idea that the rightful destiny of the United States included imperialistic expansions.By the 1840's, expansion was at the highest. The Santa Fe Trail went from Independence to the Old Spanish Trail, which went into Los Angeles. The Oxbow Route headed from Missouri to California. Others headed out on the Oregon Trail to the Pacific Northwest. In 1845, approximately 5,000 people traveled the Oregon Trail to Oregon's Willamette Valley. The Oregon Trail was the longest of the pioneer trail that went West. It traversed more than 2,000 miles' through trough prairie, desert, and rugged mountain land from Independence, Missouri to the Northwest.Another result or example of...

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