Mann Elementary Peer Inclusion Preschool Essay

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The children in Mann Elementary’s Peer Inclusion Preschool seem to be very close. At the start of the day, they find their nametag, choose a puzzle and quietly put it together at their spot. When they are finished with the puzzle, they move on to free play. One teacher brings all of the students to the bathroom in two groups, boys and then girls. After they were done with this, they went outside for thirty minutes and had free play with the swings, hula-hoops, and the playground. After outside time, they went back inside for more free time play. They then clean up and organize the room. When they feel that the room is cleaned, they choose a reading book, look at it for a few moments, and then share it with the rest of the class. They had snack time, which was a cookie, three fruit snacks, pretzels, and a glass of water. While eating, they went over each other’s names to make sure they all knew them. They finished the day at circle time where they had story time, reviewed snack, counted the kids, did the days of the week song, went over the calendar and the weather. The children were then picked up to go home.
The teachers greet every child when they walk in and helps them find their nametag and a puzzle to complete. They continuously asked the students open-ended questions throughout the day. They told the children they did a good job when finished something, and used a very positive and encouraging voice throughout the day. One child apologized for not listening the day before and Debra said that it is okay and today is a new day to listen!
After the children washed their hands, each child was given a letter card and had to match it to the letters at each of the spots at the tables. They shared with the class what letter and animal they had. The teachers quizzed the students on colors and shapes and asked them open-ended questions about them. This was a formative assessment.
After interviewing Debra Oaks, the lead teacher, I learned that this classroom is a general education peer inclusion program with eight children who are on IEPS and eight children who are not in both the morning and the afternoon class. The morning class has eight children who have developmental disabilities, including speech, cognitive, social, adaptive, fine motor, and gross motor delays. The afternoon class has two children with Autism, and six children with developmental disabilities. Children in this classroom come from Child Find evaluations, and require an entry and exit Early Childhood Outcomes assessment. Each child has informal data sheets that are kept on children’s goals along with observations and...

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