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Many Elements Of Tragedy In Streetcar Names Desire By Tennessee Williams

2348 words - 10 pages

A Streetcar Named Desire is a Pulitzer Prize-Winning play. The film was nominated for twelve nominations and was awarded four Oscars. It is a stage play with elements of tragedy. The play opened at the Ethel Barrymore Theater in New York City on December 3, 1947. The producer of the play Charles Feldman sold the production to the Warner Bros. The play was written by Tennessee Williams. Williams is considered the greatest Southern playwright and one of the greatest playwrights in the history of American Drama. Williams first play was ‘The Glass Menagerie” it was produced in 1945. Williams plays have been adapted to film starring screen greats like Marlon Brando who played Stanley and ...view middle of the document...

Blanche DuBois is a character capable of inspiring pity and love, but at the same time disappointment and hatred on the spectator or reader. No matter what she interpreted by moving off and going to New Orleans she was doomed as soon as she stepped off the Desire streetcar. Her plan to be reinvented as a new innocent, desirable and respectful woman was truly a dream. She was misunderstood especially by Stanley and because of his misunderstanding it motivated him to punish and destroy her. Blanche was described as a flirt, and a home wrecker also a manipulative, desperate woman who craved attention from the wrong things and lost her family fortune “Belle Reve”. She is a social pariah due to her indiscreet sexual behavior. She spent so long lying to everyone she actually began to believe her own lies. This is shown when she orchestrates a telegram to the wealthy and adoring Shep Huntleigh it is then that her fantasies were driven overboard. Henthorne also claimed that William prohibited her from being her own person. William often condemned the environment that brought about Blanche's tragic circumstances. William pointed out how the character Blanche DuBois was a washed-up Southern Belle. Blanche life was not in connection with reality. And she often drank to escape it. Her judgment on Her sister's husband Stanley was based on prejudice, and snobbery. Blanche believed Stanley tyrannized his wife, and treats her disrespectfully. Henthorne believes that Blanche has failed society and would do anything to believe her fantasies. An example of her often used victimization role appears in the play in scene nine. In scene nine, polka music is played in remembrance of the same tune playing when Blanche's husband killed himself. Williams stage directions stated that the music we hear is in Blanche's head, and she drinks to escape reality. Another example of her character is found on page seventeen. On this page she lied about living in “Belle Reve” a great place with white columns, and it says how she got fired.
Another Critic Hovis stated that the character Stella Kowalski was the mediating point between Blanche and Stanley. Stella was a gullible twenty-five year ole gentle, loving woman. Stella used the theme dependence on men when it came to Stanley's constant abuse to her; she believed it was okay for him to abuse her. Stella comes to her sister’s defense against her husband time and time again, starting with his accusation of a “swindle” in Scene Two and continuing as he uncovers more and more information about Blanche's past in Laurel. Hovis opinion was that Stella remained firmly on her sister’s side, refusing to believe these stories even in the face of overwhelming evidence. “You didn’t know Blanche as a girl,” she argues. “Nobody, nobody, was tender and trusting as she was”. Blanche did not try to hide her feelings towards her sister's husband Stanley. She referred to him as common and sub human. Stanley is trying to convince his wife that...

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