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Mark Twain’s Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn

1218 words - 5 pages

The picaresque novel, which first originated in Spain, is a type of fiction. There are many characteristics that need to be meet in order to have a true picaresque novel. Generally the story is given in a first person narrative. The main character is referred to as the picaro and usually is a member of the low class. The novel usually lacks a visible plot, instead it is told in a sequence of different adventures. The picaro character is usually used to point out the hypocrisies and wrongdoings of society while giving a glimpse of life through the eyes of the poor. Unlike most “hero’s” the picaro is not looking change his ways and move up in class. They reject normal society and prefer ...view middle of the document...

One example of why Huck feels this way about people has to do with his father. Huck’s father is an alcoholic who only wants to use him. He is very mean and cold to Huck and is always hitting or yelling at him. When the Widow goes to the law in an attempt to stop him from taking Huck away but the law responded by saying they did not like to interfere and separate families and since he was Huck’s father he had a right to him. So now even though Huck is scared of his father and fears he will end up killing him, he has no choice by to go with him. The law has essentially failed Huck because it cares more about the standard view rather then the well being of a child. Why would anyone want to be apart of this civilization? Here you have a kid who fears for his life being dragged away by his alcoholic father and society says its ok because it is his father. It is better to make him stay in that atmosphere because taking him away from his dad would go against the social norm of how they live. It is examples like this that make Huck want to seclude himself from society. In his eyes being part of society offers no real benefit.
Another characteristic of a picaro is not being grounded; they are known to go on a lot of adventures. When Huck ran into Jim on the Island they teamed up to travel down the Mississippi river. The river is not just a tool used to travel it is also very symbolic. The river is the road to freedom, for Jim it means being a free slave and for Huck it means being free from civilization and even more importantly his father. The river leads them on all their adventures, some they do not wish to encounter however the river is in control, not Huck or Jim. They must flow where it flows an adapt to what ever situation they encounter such as weather conditions or people. Just like the river is changing so is Huck and Jims view on life and each other. More and more Jim is starting to trust Huck, soon saying he is the only one who has kept his promises to Jim. Some of the adventures they encounter on the river are not good ones such as when they found the robbers aboard wrecked shipped. These situations keep pushing Huck away from society and further backing...

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