Mark Twain's "Huckleberry Finn", Symbolism Of The Raft.

907 words - 4 pages

Huck Finn -- The Raft SymbolismMark Twain's story of Huck Finn provided entertainment, as well as Twain's own insight on America's unjust society. At only twelve years old, Huck narrates the story and allows the reader to see events take place from a great point of view. As the adventure unfolds, the once naïve Huck realizes the harsh realities of society every time he sets foot on land. This development in the young boy's maturity begins from the very moment he and Jim begin to float down the Mississippi River. The raft that Jim and Huck had made use of provided the duo with an escape and refuge to "their own world". There, they could be who they wanted to be and do what they wanted to do without having to answer to anyone. This ultimately leads Huck to realize that he does not agree with what is "sivelized", no matter how accepted it was by everyone else.Every child needs to escape sometimes. Be it in a fort they made, a closet they transformed, a treehouse, or just their own bedroom, every kid has a hideaway place. When there, their minds are free to imagine, and they are also allowed to discover who they really are as an individual. Huck's raft was his hideaway place. Above being a site of simple gratifications and pleasures, it was a place where Huck could reject all of the conformities of society and everybody else's demands. Huck utilizes his freedom by lounging in the raft naked, free of his former clothing in which he expressed his dislike for them by previously saying, "She put me in them new clothes again, and I couldn't do nothing but sweat and sweat, and feel all cramped up." Through his freedom of self expression, he comes to realize that his way of life may very well be better than society's. With each contact in society, part of Huck's innocence was lost, which leads to his disgust with humanity. After experiences like the Grangerfords and the Boggs shooting, the refuge of Huck's almost "utopian" raft further leads him to grow as a person. It becomes apparent that he had been living a lie whenever confronted with fellow townspeople. He even admits to his excessive lying to society by saying, "I reckon a body that ups and tells the truth when he is in a tight place is taking considerable many resks, though I ain't had no experience, and can't say for certain; but it looks so to me..." Eventually he separates his thoughts so far away from society's, that he is able to befriend, and, love Jim, an escaped black slave. Such a thing...

Find Another Essay On Mark Twain's "Huckleberry Finn", Symbolism of the Raft.

Rhetorical Analysis of Mark Twain's "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn"

865 words - 3 pages Mark Twain's use of picturesque diction, symbolic punctuation, composed sentence formation, and fluent organization in this particular passage are overflowing. He uses these literary techniques to help him create the movement of the raft and time as Huck is describing it. Twain's description makes the journey seem like a peaceful experience.The colorful diction in this passage portrays the continuous, elegant motion of the raft while Huck and

Censorship Of Mark Twain's The Adventure Of Huckleberry Finn

1342 words - 5 pages Mark Twain'sThe Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is offensive, rude, ignorant, ungrammatical, insensitive, and a timeless masterpiece that should never be subject to censorship in any form or capacity. Twain's novel deals with controversial issues such as slavery, racism and bigotry. There are vulgar, racist, uncivilized and uncensored characters that speak and act in ways we find unimaginable today. African Americans are treated not as people

Racism in Mark Twain's "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn"

654 words - 3 pages In the novel Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain, Huck goes throughmany adventures on the Mississippi River. He escapes from Pap andsails down the Mississippi with an escaped slave named Jim. Huck goesthrough the moral conflict of how wrong it is to be helping Jim escapeto freedom. Eventually Huck decides he will help Jim and actuallysteals him from a farmer with the help of Tom Sawyer, a friend.Eventhough Huck and Jim are trying to sail to the Ohio

Flaws in Mark Twain's novel "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn"

895 words - 4 pages Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is by any means a classic. However, there are several flaws. First of all the coincidence that everything happens with in my mind detracts some from the story. The other major problem is that the book seems to drag on and on the closer you get to the end, as if Twain had a page quota to fill and was not worried about the story. The other problem brought up on our hand-out was Huck's lack of

Women in Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

2807 words - 11 pages in Adventures of Huck Finn," I looked at the novel with a question in mind: did Mark Twain simply apply contemporary stereotypes when creating his female characters? I put aside my bias towards the novel and considered Mary Ellen Goad's contention "that [the female characters] are merely flat and stereotypical" (Walker). My essay is not a dismissal of Walker's thesis, as I recognize her illustration of Twain's use of the "morally virtuous woman

Independence in Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

912 words - 4 pages Journey to Independence in Huckleberry Finn   In the novel, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, the main character, Huck, struggles to develop his own set of beliefs and values despite the very powerful social structure of his environment. The people he encounters and the situations he experiences while traveling down the Mississippi River help him become an independent thinker in the very conformist society of 19th century Missouri

Mark Twain's Masterpiece "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn"

2328 words - 9 pages to intelligent, respectablepeople.'But in his lifetime, Huckleberry Finn became the most remunerative of all hisworks, and has since been called an American classic. 'This book was praised by T.S.Eliot, celebrated by Ernest Hemingway, and recommended by thousands of high-schoolreading teachers.' Twain's best novel now holds the burden of much criticism that thework itself threatens to become lost amid the almost endless volume devoted to

The relationship between Huckleberry Finn and Jim in Mark Twain's "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn".

2036 words - 8 pages The relationship between Huckleberry Finn and Jim are central to Mark Twain's "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn". Huck's relationships with individual characters are unique in their own way; however, his relationship with Jim is one that is ever changing and sincere. As a poor, uneducated boy, Huck distrusts the morals and intentions of the society that treats him as an outcast and fails to protect him from abuse. The uneasiness about society

Characteristic of Huck Finn in Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn

791 words - 3 pages Huckleberry Finn, the main character, learns he must grow up fast if he wants to survive life. Huck Finnhas a drunkard as a father, a hogshead as a home, and a mother (dead ) of which he never knew. He is acongenital liar, a thief, and someone who has no respect for the rules of society. He will use every technicalityto get off with doing something completely wrong, but is ok by him. Huck is not all evil as one would think bythis introduction

Huck Finn as the Narrator in Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn

767 words - 3 pages Mark Twain chose Huck Finn to be the narrator to make the story more realistic and so that Mark Twain could get the reader to examine their own attitudes and beliefs by comparing themselves to Huck, a simple uneducated character.Twain was limited in expressing his thoughts by the fact that Huck Finn is a living, breathing person who is telling the story. Since the book is written in first person, Twain had to put himself in the place of a

Symbolism in “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” by Mark Twain

808 words - 3 pages Rivers flow freely and calmly, and people usually go to the river to get away from the hectic world around them. With nature surrounding them, people can find peace and quietness. The Mississippi River is the largest river in the United States. It’s length and width, along with its fast flowing current, makes it an ideal scene to escape civilization. In “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” by Mark Twain, the two main characters, Huck and Jim

Similar Essays

Mark Twain's The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn

1978 words - 8 pages raising himself which has contributed to the development of his own moral code. Although there is plenty of violence and action abound in the novel, there is equal excitement to be had in the moral choices Huck encounters along his journey due to the potential danger in which his decisions consistently place him. In his novel, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain creates suspenseful and dramatic instances by emphasizing the internal moral

Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn Essay

1458 words - 6 pages Freedom is an important concept in Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. The two protagonists of this novel, Huck and Jim, are both searching for freedom in their escape down the river. Critic Julius Lester claims that the view of freedom in this novel is a puerile one of escape from responsibility and restraint. However, Mark Twain's notion of freedom in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is not one of freedom from responsibility

The Public Reception Of Mark Twain's Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn

948 words - 4 pages The Public Reception of Mark Twain's Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Upon its publication in 1884, Mark Twain's Adventures of Huckleberry Finn was met with mixed reviews. Some reviewers called it flat, trashy, and irreverent. Others called it Twain's best work yet, hailing his humor and style throughout the novel. Though obscure at first, reviews began to appear in many newspapers throughout the country as more and more became interested in

The Outcast In Mark Twain's The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn

647 words - 3 pages examples of this type of book is Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, technically a "river book" rather than a "road book". In it, as in many "road books" before and since, spending a long period of time away from society allows the protagonist to see the difference between the rules of mainstream society and the freedom of the wilderness. Through his journey, Twain illustrates the futility of living within society as contrasted to the