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Mark Twain's Novel, Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn Is A Brilliant Satire Against Racism

951 words - 4 pages

Mark Twain's novel, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a brilliant satire against racism. Two significant reasons support this thesis. First, the various subplots within the novel itself serve to disdain not only the 'peculiar institution' of slavery, but also its place in Southern society. Second, the development of what many consider to be the hero of the story, Jim, serves as an example of the humanity of African-Americans during a time period in which African-Americans as a whole were associated with a type of animalism.Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, through the developments of the innumerable subplots, undermines what many have come to believe as the perfect antebellum new frontier, a ...view middle of the document...

Who is he to pass judgment on an entire era in American history? Who is Pap Finn, a fictitious character, to give us a first-hand account of antebellum sentiments? The answer to both is that Pap Finn should not ever be allowed to address any serious issues pertaining to national politics, because it seems that all of his answers are found at the bottom of a bottle. Twain chooses to tell his story through the eyes of those that history seems to skip over, and in doing so, he seems to burn a few bridges; but this is what has made his work great.The way in which Jim develops through the novel is critical to Twain's overall message in Adventures of Huckleberry Finn that African-Americans were and are people capable of all that comes to be associated with humanity. Twain, or rather, Huck, gives us several examples of this. Jim's thoughts, conversations, and actions while interacting with Huck, as well as others, shows us that Jim, as well as slaves in general, are people just as the white man is. Jim's sadness and sense of relief while he and Huck are separated in the fog at Cairo, his sense of regret for striking his daughter Lizbeth for perceived insubordination, and his willingness to put others' lives in front of his own, such as when he helps save Tom Sawyer, all express this. These points are but a few examples of Jim's humanity. Although he is uneducated and poorly-spoken, he shows a true willingness...

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