Mark Twain's The Adventure Of Huckleberry Finn. Huck: Adaptable, Clever, And Caring.

687 words - 3 pages

Huck in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain is consistently running from something. The Novel was published in 1885; however, the story takes place in the pre Civil War era along the great Mississippi River. Because Huck is habitually on the run, the reader can see how Huck shows himself to be adaptable, clever, and caring.Throughout the many situations Huck gets into, he adapts. In the beginning of the story, Huck says he was "free and satisfied" living an uncivilized life. However, when he moves in with the Widow Douglas and Miss Watson, he gets used to a more civilized life. He even admits his liking to it: "...I was getting so I liked the new ones [ways], too." After his Pap takes him, Huck adapts, saying after a while, "I didn't want to go back no more." However, when Huck realizes he was tired of the way Pap treated him, he adapts to the river and to his resources to leave Pap. He even adapts well to the island by scouting out food sources and finding ways to pass his time. Huck adapts throughout the story because it is the way in which he survives.Throughout his adventure, Huckleberry Finn also demonstrates his cleverness. Sometimes his schemes are well thought out; while other instances they are just spur of the moment improvising. One of Huck's best schemes is his "death." Huck decides the only way to get away from Pap is to make him think he is dead. Therefore, he kills a boar with Pap's rifle, slits its stomach, and swaths the blood throughout Pap's cabin. He then drags the dead boar to the river and escapes. Additionally, when Huck and Jim are on the raft and the slave hunters come wandering by Huck has to tell a quick lie: that there is, in fact, someone else in his canoe and that is his father. They believe him, but want to see him. Huck tells them not too, but they insist. Huck continually hesitates until the slave...

Find Another Essay On Mark Twain's The Adventure of Huckleberry Finn. Huck: adaptable, clever, and caring.

Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn Essay

1458 words - 6 pages Freedom is an important concept in Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. The two protagonists of this novel, Huck and Jim, are both searching for freedom in their escape down the river. Critic Julius Lester claims that the view of freedom in this novel is a puerile one of escape from responsibility and restraint. However, Mark Twain's notion of freedom in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is not one of freedom from responsibility

The relationship between Huckleberry Finn and Jim in Mark Twain's "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn"

2036 words - 8 pages The relationship between Huckleberry Finn and Jim are central to Mark Twain's "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn". Huck's relationships with individual characters are unique in their own way; however, his relationship with Jim is one that is ever changing and sincere. As a poor, uneducated boy, Huck distrusts the morals and intentions of the society that treats him as an outcast and fails to protect him from abuse. The uneasiness about society

Mark Twain's Huck Finn, the true sign of maturity?

817 words - 3 pages 'To live with fear and not be afraid is the greatest sign of maturity.' If this is true, then Mark Twain's Huck Finn is the greatest example of maturity. Huck is the narrator of Twain's book, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. In the book Huck, a young boy from the American South, travels down the Mississippi River with a runaway slave. The two encounter many adventures and meet many different people. Along the way, not only does Huck mature

The Public Reception of Mark Twain's Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

948 words - 4 pages for the advertising that they gave the novel. In contrast to the negative reviews which Huckleberry Finn received were many shining reviews which praised the novel and its author. The novel which was written with young boys in mind, they said, would be enjoyable to readers of all ages for its humor and adventure. A review in the Athenaeum called Huck Finn Twain's best work, and raving that the wit and humor throughout the novel were

Rhetorical Analysis of Mark Twain's "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn"

865 words - 3 pages Mark Twain's use of picturesque diction, symbolic punctuation, composed sentence formation, and fluent organization in this particular passage are overflowing. He uses these literary techniques to help him create the movement of the raft and time as Huck is describing it. Twain's description makes the journey seem like a peaceful experience.The colorful diction in this passage portrays the continuous, elegant motion of the raft while Huck and

The Outcast in Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

647 words - 3 pages examples of this type of book is Mark Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, technically a "river book" rather than a "road book". In it, as in many "road books" before and since, spending a long period of time away from society allows the protagonist to see the difference between the rules of mainstream society and the freedom of the wilderness. Through his journey, Twain illustrates the futility of living within society as contrasted to the

Mark Twain's Life and Work, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

1013 words - 5 pages . His first book “The celebrated jumping frog of Calaveras County,” was published on 1865, becomes a bestseller. “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” was his major work. The book described colorful aspects of people and place, Mississippi river. Huckleberry Finn lives with Miss Watson, one day his drunken father, Pap kidnapped and locks Huck in the cabin. He drunk and bit Huck. Huck escaped from his drunken father by faking his own death

Women in Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

2807 words - 11 pages in Adventures of Huck Finn," I looked at the novel with a question in mind: did Mark Twain simply apply contemporary stereotypes when creating his female characters? I put aside my bias towards the novel and considered Mary Ellen Goad's contention "that [the female characters] are merely flat and stereotypical" (Walker). My essay is not a dismissal of Walker's thesis, as I recognize her illustration of Twain's use of the "morally virtuous woman

Mark Twain's "Huckleberry Finn", Symbolism of the Raft

907 words - 4 pages Huck Finn -- The Raft SymbolismMark Twain's story of Huck Finn provided entertainment, as well as Twain's own insight on America's unjust society. At only twelve years old, Huck narrates the story and allows the reader to see events take place from a great point of view. As the adventure unfolds, the once naïve Huck realizes the harsh realities of society every time he sets foot on land. This development in the young boy's maturity begins

Mark Twain's Masterpiece "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn"

2328 words - 9 pages Mark Twain and his masterpieceThe Adventures of Huckleberry Finn________A Research PaperPresented to Mr. Neilof Chula Vista High School________In Partial Fulfillmentof the Requirements for English 10 Honors/Gate________By:Id #: 937228May 16, 1996OutlineI. Samuel ClemensA. Who he isB. Where he was bornC. FamilyII. How Samuel came to be Mark TwainA. His working lifeB. First writingsIII. The Adventures of Huck FinnA. Story Plot1. The outside of the

Racism in Mark Twain's "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn"

654 words - 3 pages In the novel Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain, Huck goes throughmany adventures on the Mississippi River. He escapes from Pap andsails down the Mississippi with an escaped slave named Jim. Huck goesthrough the moral conflict of how wrong it is to be helping Jim escapeto freedom. Eventually Huck decides he will help Jim and actuallysteals him from a farmer with the help of Tom Sawyer, a friend.Eventhough Huck and Jim are trying to sail to the Ohio

Similar Essays

Censorship Of Mark Twain's The Adventure Of Huckleberry Finn

1342 words - 5 pages story, but if it were not for Huck's blatant racism -in both language and mindset- it wouldn't carry nearly the same significance. Huck is a racist, but censoring the word "nigger" from his vocabulary would cripple him as a character.The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn should not be edited, censored, or redacted for any reason. Twain's work is without doubt stereotypical, but the stereotype set for African Americans at the time would be correct

Huck Finn As The Narrator In Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn

767 words - 3 pages Mark Twain chose Huck Finn to be the narrator to make the story more realistic and so that Mark Twain could get the reader to examine their own attitudes and beliefs by comparing themselves to Huck, a simple uneducated character.Twain was limited in expressing his thoughts by the fact that Huck Finn is a living, breathing person who is telling the story. Since the book is written in first person, Twain had to put himself in the place of a

Characteristic Of Huck Finn In Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn

791 words - 3 pages Huckleberry Finn, the main character, learns he must grow up fast if he wants to survive life. Huck Finnhas a drunkard as a father, a hogshead as a home, and a mother (dead ) of which he never knew. He is acongenital liar, a thief, and someone who has no respect for the rules of society. He will use every technicalityto get off with doing something completely wrong, but is ok by him. Huck is not all evil as one would think bythis introduction

Mark Twain's The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn

1978 words - 8 pages raising himself which has contributed to the development of his own moral code. Although there is plenty of violence and action abound in the novel, there is equal excitement to be had in the moral choices Huck encounters along his journey due to the potential danger in which his decisions consistently place him. In his novel, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain creates suspenseful and dramatic instances by emphasizing the internal moral