Marlowe’s Presentation Of The Gothic Protagonist Dr. Faustus

525 words - 2 pages

In Christopher Marlowe’s ‘Dr. Faustus’, Faustus is presented as the Gothic protagonist. Typical features of a Gothic protagonist include things such as: being ambitious, have an inability to make decision and they are typically easily persuaded amongst others.
Marlow does present Faustus as someone with these features; however Faustus does not have all of the features of the ideal gothic protagonist.
Faustus is an ambitious character. In the first Chorus he is compared to Icarus as “his waxen wings did mount above his reach”, much like in the story of Icarus whose waxen wings melted when he believed he could fly away from Crete and reach the sun due to his high ambition. This also shows that Faustus is self-conceited because he believes he can do such impossible things. Faustus also shows his great ambition in his life story. He strived to be the best in his subject area of Divinity, and was eventually regarded with a “doctor’s name”. Faustus’ main ambition however is to become greater than God. He wishes to have the omniscience of God, so he can know “all the secrets of foreign kings” and so he can be “resolved of all ambiguities”. He also wishes to have God’s omnipotence so he can control the physics of the world at his will. For example, he wishes to “make swift Rhine circle fair Wittenberg” and “make the moon drop from her sphere”. This is typical of the Gothic protagonist because they typically wish to achieve that of the impossible, and something that only God would be able to do, which traditionally...

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