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Marxist Criticism In Black Boy Essay

870 words - 3 pages

Faced with the segregation of white and blacks; rich and poor, communist and anti communists, the intellectuals and illiterate, the “haves” and the “have nots”, Richard Wright, a black boy from down south struggles to prove himself to not only his family and the rest of the world, but himself. Richard struggles with a black culture that tries to reshape him according to what it believes he should be which is less bookish, more obedient, and more religious. In the book Black Boy; by Richard Wright, Wright reveals a fundamental insight into human nature: that there is nothing that really separates people except for what they separate themselves by.
In the United States there has always been a struggle with segregation between races. During the early to mid 1900’s is when racial segregation became more prevalent in society. For example, the most significant moment demonstrating this message took place when Richard moved to Arkansas and became friends with boy at school. These boys were black like him. He found that he shared the same hostility towards whites and the racial pride as he did. This hostility and racial pride grew with the desire and want to fit in. During that time period it was not only scarce to see a while and black kid being friends, but it was socially unacceptable. This scene proves that people segregate themselves because Richard chose who to be friends with. He felt comfortable being in this group because they were of the same color as him. Because of the segregation between white and blacks that surrounded the kids and young adults, they fell into the trap and developed the same habits. Not all people wanted to be segregated but they fell into the habit because it was the life they knew.
When a group of people becomes segregated, stereotypes and assumptions are often formed. It is assumed many times in the book by multiple characters that because Richard has colored skin and is not wealthy he is uneducated. To illustrate, the most significant moment demonstrating this message took place when Richard was working at an optical shop. During work one day he had the opportunity of going to the library. By this time Richard had shown a strong interest in reading and in books. He went to go run some errands and stopping at the library was one of them. The people at work started to question him when he was seen with books so he had to keep it a secret. Also it had...

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