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Mary Rowlandson Essay

1183 words - 5 pages

Mary Rowlandson Mrs. Mary Rowlandson was the wife of a Harvard-educated minister by the name of Joseph Rowlandson. They resided in a small colonial town called Lancaster and they were the children of the first settlers here. We will come to see of Mary's ruthless captivity as well as her shocking release and look closely at the faith she kept in God, as well as her homecoming. Mary Rowlandson was first taken captive during King Philips War, when Indians attacked and burnt down her village. She and her youngest child were separated from the rest of their family. Her youngest child being injured and sick died not too much longer after becoming captive. Mary was also injured but was pushed on to follow the Indians farther inland, all she had to get her through was her faith. Mary Rowlandson gives the people a distinct look into the life that she had lived during this time as a settler as well as a captive. She shows us how society as well as herself viewed the Indians and as well as what she endured throughout her captivity. During this time period people living in the new colonies were afraid of the Indians, they looked at them as savages and devils. Their society was centered on great faith in God and Christianity and they were coming face to face with the devil, as they would put it. All throughout the story you hear the word heathen used to describe the Indians, this word in itself shows how Mary as well as society viewed them. The settlers also used Johnson 2 words such as hellhound, merciless, devils and so on to describe the Indians. During Mary's captivity she used one description that compels the readers; it says that they were black creatures in the night, like hell. Rather ironic is the fact that an Indian gave Mary a bible to have and read. As they drove her on into the woods week by week, and the book continues she just begins to refer to the Indians by name or heathens. She also states that the Indian who bought her, her master had become her best friend, all though he was an Indian. Here you can see that her mindset toward the Indians is changing, not a lot but some. When she arrived at King Philips camp she began to cry for fear that she was going to die. When she asked them this they just laughed at her and said no. This shows us that although they treated her like a dog, they had some use for her and became nicer. Eventually some Indians came to her to make stockings and other types of clothing for them; in return they would give her money or food. This was a blessing to her because during her first few weeks of...

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