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Maslow’s Hierarchy Of Needs And Yann Martel’s Life Of Pi

1021 words - 5 pages

There comes a time in point of life when you’re stuck in a hiccup and you have to do whatever it takes to overcome the obstacles. In the Life of Pi, Pi undergoes many obstacles and he has to test the five levels of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs to be able to survive. Maslow’s hierarchy of needs consists of five levels such as: Physiological, Safety, Love, Esteem, and Self Actualization. Does Pi have what it takes to overcome these obstacles by using the five levels of hierarchy?
Life of Pi by Yann Martel, tells a story about a survivor on a life boat with a dead Zebra, Hyena, Orangutan and a tiger he names Richard Parker for 226 days on a boat stranded in the middle of nowhere. Pi grew up ...view middle of the document...

Maslow introduces the hierarchy on needs in a pyramid using the bottom of the pyramid as the basic needs and making your way up to the top to being the more complex hierarchy of needs. The needs at the bottom of the pyramid consist of food, water, breathing and so on which he calls the physiological level. After those needs have been met, they can move to the next level of the pyramid which then involves the security of health, morality and the family which is the level of safety. The next level is love which includes the love of family and friendship. The next two and last two levels are the more complex part of the pyramid and the hierarchy of needs that include Esteem and Self Actualization involving confidence, self esteem and creativity, problem solving and acceptance of facts. All the needs mentioned are important to motivating behavior which is called the “D-needs” meaning that these needs become more apparent to society’s necessities. The most complex part of the pyramid is known as growth needs or as Maslow would call it “B-Needs”. As Maslow would describe “B-Needs” is, “Growth needs do not stem from a lack of something, but rather from a desire to grow as a person”.
The Life of Pi is the hierarchy of needs to concur the obstacles Pi faced to survive. In India, Pi lives a great life where he can sleep under a roof over his head, food whenever he would like at any time. When Pi is stuck on a life boat he knows what items he needs to be able to survive the 226 days and on that first level Pi uses his physiological needs. Pi states” I had to find a means of sheltering myself…Hadn’t I just read that exposure could inflict a quick death…My own supplies...

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