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Jem´S Maturity In To Kill A Mockingbird By Harper Lee

927 words - 4 pages

“Maturity is the ability to think, speak and act your feelings within the bounds of dignity. The measure of your maturity is how spiritual you become during the midst of your frustrations.” is a quote from Samuel Ullman. This describes the struggles that Jem went through by taking part in the community and trial and by also taking the risk of losing some of his friends and family in Harper Lee’s, To Kill a Mockingbird. Through Jem’s interaction with the racism of Maycomb, he became aware of the things around him. We all learn that it takes a strong person to overcome the barriers of society.

Jem had changed throughout the story from acting like a child and doing things that children do to becoming more mature and taking part in the community. When Dill had ran away from his mom and stepdad during the summer Jem and Scout had found him under the bed in Scout’s room. Scout was planning to hide him in her room: however, Jem had other plans. “Dill’s eyes flickered at Jem and Jem looked at the floor. Then he rose and broke the remaining code of our childhood. He went out of the room and down the hall. “Atticus, can you come here a minute, sir?” (pg. 74) For years, Jem and Dill had been the best of friends. Dill had found Jem trustworthy, however, Jem was willing to do what was right even if it means losing a friends trust. Towards the end of the summer, when Dill was getting ready to leave Jem felt that it was necessary that Dill should learn to swim. He has spent the next week going to the creek to teach him. "Jem had discovered with angry amazement that nobody had ever bothered to teach Dill how to swim, a skill Jem considered necessary as walking. They had spent two afternoons at the creek, they said they were going in naked and I couldn't come..." (Pg. 121) Jem was willing to put in the time to teach Dill how to swim. He wasn't in it for himself, he knew that it was something that Dill would need to know so he was willing to use his own time and effort to teach him, which is why he was becoming more mature and was taking part in the community.

Jem was becoming more involved in the trial and was starting to recognize the difference between what was right and what was wrong. After watching the trial, Jem saw that the people of Maycomb were being unjust to Tom Robinson and giving the Ewells an unfair advantage. “There’s something in this world that makes men lose their heads- they couldn’t be fair...

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