Maus And The Holocaust Essay

899 words - 4 pages

The Holocaust is known to all of us in some manner. Maybe we know someone who survived this

terrible event in history, or one has learned about it in school, either way, everyone has had some kind of

knowledge about the horrible things that the Nazi party did to the European Jews during the Holocaust.

The Holocaust took a great toll on many lives in one way or another, one in particular being Vladek

Spiegleman.  Vladek's personality underwent a huge change due to his experiences during World

War II.  His personality is so dynamic and it was the experiences that he made during the Holocaust that

changed him so dramamtically.

 

    In the beginning of Maus the reader is thrown into a scenario of the Author, Art's, many visits to his

father's. Art and his father, Vladek starte a conversation about Vladek's past, but Vladek is very reluctant

to discuss his past with anyone Vladek seems to be a very untrusting old man who is afraid of two major

things. The main fear Vladek has is taping into his memories only to relive the pain he suffered and

because of this Vladek has a fear of getting too close to anybody. He thinks that he will be betrayed in

the  same ay that he was before by many Germans and even his own friends. The way he is so

cold-hearted to his second-wife also shows how unloving Vladek is too anybody who did not make the

same exact experiences as he did. Even to his own son, Vladek has  trouble opening up about personal

memories and being loving and caring. All these bitter emotions that keep Vladek from being happy in his

old age are casued from the painful memories of the Holocaust. Vladek's experiences during the war

caused a dramatic change in him.

 

    Before the war, Vladek has not at all a bitter, old miser. Not at all. He was a fun-loving young man

with his whole future ahead of him. He didn't seem to have care in the world and was a happy bachelor.

He eventually met Anja and sure enough they got married. His marriage with Anja really didn't change

the way he ated to other people, he was still always enthusiastic. It wsn't until the war started the Vladek

got a little more precautious about a few things. Whenever a bad thing would happen, Vladek would

remain hopefull and trusted that things would go well for hima nd his family in the long run.

    Even when Vladek had to fight in World War II and was put in a...

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