Maycomb’s Madness Of Racism, In To Kill A Mockingbird

1004 words - 4 pages

Every town has problems and the town of Maycomb from the novel To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee is no different. Maycomb citizens are put forth with social problems created from racism. As a result of racism, physical abuse was plentiful in the town of Maycomb. The citizens of Maycomb were caught up in a cycle of racial discrimination, proving that racism does not benefit anyone.
The citizens of Maycomb deal with many social issues due to the conflict of racism. Social out casting is a result of racism. This can be proven when Jem says, “They don’t belong anywhere. Coloured folks won’t have ‘em because they’re half white, white folks won’t have ‘em ‘cause they’re coloured, so they’re just in between, don’t belong anywhere. “(Harper Lee, page 161). The mixed children of Mr. Raymond are socially out casted from the whole town, as no one wants to be with them, both races find them a disgrace to their own race. These children have got no one, but themselves to be with and this is not fair because these children could be just as capable as any other child. This shows Maycomb’s disregard to equality. Moreover, children’s minds are often diluted with confusion because of the prejudice acts of racism. Dill is an innocent child who is also put through this confusion as he says, “That old Mr. Gilmer doin’ him thataway, talking so hateful to him….It was the way he said it made me sick, plain sick” ( Harper Lee, page 198) The adults in Maycomb are unfortunately diverting Dill’s mind. Dill being too young to understand the people of Maycomb, realizes that being racist is unfair. In addition, verbal aggression creates tension between many citizens of Maycomb. Tension is built through, “You ain’t got no business bringin’ white chillum here-they got their church, we got our’n.” (Harper Lee, page 119). Social segregation exists from both races. They do not respect each other and do not care about feelings. The fact that Lula does not want white children in the church creates tension between both races causing social segregation. Similarly prejudice judgments on different races are caused by typical stereotypes. Stereotypes are revealed to readers in Tom’s death,“To Maycomb, Tom‘s death was typical. Typical of a nigger to cut and run. Typical of a nigger’s mentality to have no plan, no thought for the future, just run first chance he saw….You know how they are…Nigger’s always comes out in ‘em.” The people in Maycomb were prejudice against each other, they built stereotypes against each other, not thinking about whether it was true or not. They were caught up in putting each other down, but they never realized that they were all people. Social segregation never benefited anyone in the town, but no one realized this and so they continued with their unacceptable behavior. Racism in Maycomb was never restricted by anyone and so it continued to branch into severe issues.
Maycomb’s racism has gone to an extreme of it...

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