Meaning Of Moral Absolutism Essay

1246 words - 5 pages

EXPLAIN THE MEANING OF MORAL ABSOLUTISMEveryone has different views on a situation; someone either has a relativist or absolute point view. In order to distinguish the difference between the two, it is important to define the two. Moral absolutism is when there is only one correct answer to every moral problem and situation. In an absolutists opinion something is always right or wrong regardless of the situation. In contrast, Moral relativism is when there are no universally valid moral principles so a moral problem can be either right or wrong. In moral relativism there are no objective ethical truthsThere are strength and weaknesses to both moral theories. Beginning with the weaknesses to moral relativism, that relativism can cause a wrong action to be justified in someone's opinion. This leads to our society remaining stationary and not progressing. It also implies that there can be no real evaluation or criticism of practices and it fails to realise that specific moral values are present globally. There is an obvious problem when relativism is applied to certain issues that some people consider to be immoral, but other societies believe to be moral and good. However, there are strengths to the theory as it causes relativists to have respect and tolerance for other societies and cultures beliefs in a certain scenario. Also an action is evaluated upon situation and doesn't rely on God.Similarly, there are strengths and weaknesses to absolutism. Clearly a weakness is that absolutism does not take into account the circumstance of each situation and therefore an action that is illegal is automatically frowned upon disregarding the fact that it may have taken place for a good reason. For example, a mother may steal food in order to feed her starving children. In today's culture everything is very diverse which can cause absolutists to become very intolerant. Also, everyone has their own interpretation of a moral problem, so we essentially don't know what is right or wrong. Strengths of Absolutism includes that is allows moral situations to be evaluate critically and in depth. Some people may argue that it is justified that people are treated the same in wrong doings as the rules are equal for everyone.Situations ethics is when morality depends on the circumstances of the situation. In situations ethics there are no universal valid moral principles as all the cases are different and deserve unique evaluation. A person who believes in situation ethics approaches an ethical problem with a variety of knowledge of moral principles rather than a set of stern ethical laws and I prepared to give up some of these principles to serve the greater good. For example abortion as some may think its wrong, but perceive it as acceptable if it endangers the mother's life. The concept of situation ethics was established by Joseph Fletcher. He believed that in moral laws can be disregarded to begin with as you should look at the situation and an individual's...

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