This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Measuring Safety Perceptions Of Aviation Crew

909 words - 4 pages

1. Introduction (background about the issue/topic under investigation):
1.1 Aviation:
The discovery of flight has taken man to places he never imagined he could reach. The aviation industry, which is an output of this discovery, is now a global enterprise with an estimated 3 billion people travelling by air in the year 2012 alone (ICAO, 2014).
Safety related research in aviation has received a lot of importance since the birth of the commercial aviation industry. Even though aviation is considered to be one of the safest means of transportation available, it has still a long way to go before it can match the perceptions of people. With some nations even having achieved the mark of less than one accident per million departures (ICAO). An insight into this accident data clearly suggests that while regions such as North America and certain countries in Western Europe are posting lower rates, countries from Latin America and Africa are no where close (ICAO).
The focus of human factors research is to try and put man into the center of the picture with as little effort as possible. With almost 80% of deaths occurring worldwide falling under transport related accidents (citation needed), the attention that safety in this area has received from researchers is justified. While scientific advancements have been able to bring down these numbers, uneven spread of these advanced technologies has prevented the same from happening throughout the world. With money and political stability also being reasons behind the availability of these scientific advancements, some countries are falling behind in the race (ICAO).

1.2 Errors:

1.3 Safety in Aviation industry:

1.3.1 Air Crew
1.3.2 Crew Resource Management (CRM):
1.4 Culture:
1.4.1 Overview:
1.4.2 Cultural factors in aviation industry:
1.5 Cultural factors and Safety:
Hofstede’s dimensions on national culture have been used as a benchmark by most researchers trying to work in the area of cross-cultural research. An intensive review of various cross cultural methodologies that can be used in research have been summarized (Schaffer & Riordan, 2003).

1.6 Safety culture:

1.6.1 Measuring safety culture:
1.7 Summary:

2. Aim (state aim, research question and or hypothesis):

Aviation is one of the safest high-risk industries around. In order to improve this perception air travel needs to be safe uniformly throughout the world. While technology and scientific advancements give developed countries the edge, the people from other nations need to feel safe too. If successful this research will help include culture as an important factor in safety culture models of aviation industry. It would help change the perceptions of people towards air travel safety.
The aim of this proposed research is to investigate further the effect of national culture and cultural interfaces on aviation...

Find Another Essay On Measuring Safety Perceptions of Aviation Crew

How Safe is Our Sky? Essay

1025 words - 5 pages the high standards of the safety of aviation. On July 6, 2013, Asiana Airlines flight 214 crash landed just short of the threshold of San Francisco International Airport’s runway 28L. Flight 214’s tail struck the seawall in front of the runway. The aircraft then spun around, breaking into sections of flame. Such a dramatic crash resulted in 200 passengers with injuries and three deaths among the 288 passengers and 16 crew members on board the

Safety in Aviation Organizations Essay

1610 words - 7 pages The intent of this research is to provide the reader with insight on how Crew Resource Management (CRM) improves safety in aviation organizations. This research will also present how CRM establishes a set of guidelines, behavioral norms, and standard operational practices that enables an organization to utilize all resources available to conduct safe and efficient flight operations. CRM encompasses a wide range of knowledge, skills and attitudes

Aircraft Maintainence

1524 words - 6 pages checking system. Thus, CASA had provided the regulations that are more simple and clear. 7. Medical Certification of Cabin Crew Members .(Australian Government Civil Aviation Safety Authority ,2006) (ref.4) November 2002, the objective of this regulation is to outline possible requirement for a future note to proposed CARS part 67 that may extend the class 2 medical standard requirements to cabin crew who regularly perform in-flight duties which

Safety Culture and Profit: Aviation's Continuing Organizational Dilemma

4075 words - 16 pages make those airplanes fly, and the crews in both accidents likely perceived there could be punitive actions against them if they did not complete those flights.In his paper titled "Culture, CRM, and Aviation Safety," Brent Hayward (1997) echoes many of the organizational safety philosophies of your author. Hayward suggests that a safety culture is based on perceptions with some being good and others being bad. More importantly, many of these

Safety in Aviation Organizations

1922 words - 8 pages The International Journal of Aviation Psycology, 19-32. Lauber, J.K., Cooper, G.E., & White, M.D. (Eds.) (1980). "Resource management on the flightdeck," Proceedings of a NASA/Industry Workshop (NASA CP-2120). National Transportation Safety Board. (1979). Aircraft Accident Report: United Airlines, Inc., Douglas DC-8-54, N8082U, Portland, Oregon, December 28, 1978. NTSB, Washington D.C. Royal Aeronautical Society. (1999) Crew Resource Management London, England. Retrieved from: http://www.raes-hfg.com/reports/crm-now.htm

The Federal Aviation Administration Should Not Shut Down Small Airport Air Traffic Control Towers

2612 words - 11 pages percentage, the number of crashes divided by the number of flights, was .00125% (Accident and Incident Data). In the last ten years there were forty seven accidents and incidents (Canavan). The accident percent was roughly .000125% (Accident and Incident Data). The Federal Aviation Administration was the driving force of the effort to improve safety. One of the programs that the Federal Aviation Administration implemented was the Air Traffic Control

Significant Developments in the Regulation of Air Travel

1157 words - 5 pages hijacking President Kennedy amended the Federal Aviation Act of 1958 to make it a crime to hijack or interfere with the flight crew, or carry dangerous weapons aboard an aircraft. To implement to changes the FAA safety inspectors began to receive specialized training for duty aboard airliners. In 1962, the attorney General Robert Kennedy instilled FAA peace officers as special U.S. deputy marshals. They were armed and travelled only when

The Importance of Communication and Teamwork Among the Flight and Cabin Crew

2018 words - 8 pages interdependent on one another. Sometimes in aviation the Captain is thought of as "god", you don't dare approach him or question him. A lot of cabin and flight crews are afraid to approach the Captain about a safety concern for fear of how he'll react. Slowly this attitude has been changing. How can a cockpit be effectively run if the Captain's own crew can not work together?      One example of how these attitudes

The Importance Of Communication, And Teamwork Among The Flight And Cabin Crew

2527 words - 11 pages interdependent on one another. Sometimes in aviation the Captain is thought of as 'god', you don't dare approach him or question him. A lot of cabin and flight crews are afraid to approach the Captain about a safety concern for fear of how he'll react. Slowly this attitude has been changing. How can a cockpit be effectively run if the Captain's own crew can not work together?One example of how these attitudes can affect the way hazardous situations are

Major and Regional Airlines

2244 words - 9 pages addition to pilot training, pilot fatigue has been shown to be a hazard in commercial flight operations. Many factors contribute to fatigue in the commercial aviation environment. Circadian rhythm disruption, prolonged work schedules, inadequate crew rest, and inadequate restful sleep contribute to the potential for pilot fatigue (Pilot Fatigue). In recent years, the National Transportation Safety Board has cited pilot fatigue as a possible factor in

Air/Aviation Law an Expanding Field of Study in India

3596 words - 14 pages Anti-Hijacking Act, 1982, and the Suppression of Unlawful Acts against Safety of Civil Aviation Act, 1982, give effect to the Conventions, on the requisite penal offences and certain other acts committed on board of aircraft, to which India is a signatory . These legislations are very important as they seek to preserve the rights of aircraft passengers and strive to ensure that a wrongdoer is punished to the maximum degree to deter others from

Similar Essays

Crew Resource Management Airline Industry Aviation Safety

4739 words - 19 pages Crew Resource ManagamentCRM AND AVIATION SAFETY Crew Resource Management and Aviation SafetyAbstract Throughout the history of aviation, accidents have and will continue to occur. With the introduction of larger and more complex aircraft, the number of humans required to operate these complex machines has increased as well as, some say, the probability of human error. There are studies upon studies of aircraft accidents and incidents resulting

"When Wind Blows" Aviation Safety Essay About Loss Of Control During Takeoff Or Landing. Major Cause Of Aviation Accidents

1161 words - 5 pages When Wind BlowsWhen the wind blows, the risks increase for light aircraft operations. The single leading cause of accidents involves loss of directional control during takeoff or landing. The AOPA Air Safety Foundation's General Aviation Weather Accident Safety Review shows that over an 11-year period the National Transportation Safety Board identified wind as a primary cause of more than 2,800 accidents. These occurred primarily on landings

Aviation Legislation Essay

1494 words - 6 pages responsible to regulate Civil Aviation and provide designated aviation services with emphasis on safety and security and to strengthen the aviation industry within the UAE and its upper airspace. The following responsibilities and functions of the GCAA are given for the implementation of aircraft safety regulations within the UAE: • Establish the general policies, rules and regulations in relation to civil aviation in the UAE. By this, they will also

How Safe Is Our Sky? Essay

1575 words - 7 pages aircraft then spun around, breaking into sections of flame. Such a dramatic crash resulted in 200 passengers with injuries and three deaths among the 288 passengers and 16 crew members on board the fatal flight (Jansen). Less than a year later, the disappearance of M370 alarms the nation of Malaysia and many other countries. These recent, unfortunate occurrences cause many to question the safety of aviation, and further information supports the fear of