Medea And Lysistrata Essay

548 words - 2 pages

Medea and Lysistrata

Medea and Lysistrata are two Greek literatures that depict the power which women are driven to achieve in an aim to defy gender inequality. In The Medea, Medea is battling against her husband Jason whom she hates. On the other hand, in Aristophanes' Lysistrata, the protagonist Lysistrata plotted to convince and organize the female gender to protest against the stubbornness of men. In terms of defining the purpose of these two literatures, it is apparent that Euripedes and Aristophanes created characters that demonstrate resistance against the domination of men in the society.

Despite the contrast in the characters of Euripedes' Medea and Aristophanes' Lysistrata, the two playwrights depicted how gender inequality can start a fire. As with Medea and Jason, the battle between the two lead to former's madness, leading to the death of the enemies she considered, and, unfortunately, leading as well to the death of her own children. Medea felt betrayed and left behind by her husband Jason, as well as continuously aggravated by Creon despite the fact that it was she who was in a disadvantaged position. From these aggravations to a female character, Euripedes perhaps intends to speak of the possible consequences that gender inequality may cause. As in the case of Medea, the consequence is a tragedy on the lives of the other characters.

On the other hand, in Lysistrata, Aristophanes made use of a character that is in contrast to that of Euripedes'. Lysistrata, whose actions were similarly provoked by resistance against gender inequality, depicted a character that is strong and very much unlike to Medea's...

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