Medicating Young Minds Essay

1335 words - 5 pages

Medicating Young Minds

In the article, “Medicating Young Minds”, which was published in Time magazine, dated November 3, 2003, it is stated that using stimulant medication on the youth is harmful. The article's author, Jeffrey Kluger, states that society must find alternative ways to treat young people for problems such as; ADD, ADHD, depression, anxiety, etc. Jeffrey Kluger's argument is not very persuasive for various reasons: their ill-logical beliefs, their sarcastic tones, their opinion and lack of fact based information, and their tendency to be biased in their writing. All of these reasons make it a poor argument over a very important subject.

In the article, “Medicating Young Minds” author Jeffrey Kluger goes into detail about the problems of medicating children today. It is Klugers et al belief that it should not be happening; medicating the youth. His argument is logical to himself but, it may not be to everyone, especially people who need medication to survive. Kluger uses a sarcastic tone and is somewhat biased in his article. He believes that people today are just looking for the easy way out to feel better, when in reality they use medications to help them be successful in life. He states reasons for why he feels medications to aid ADD, ADHD, depression, anxiety and other mood disorders are bad, but does not give logical explanations to back it up. Kluger states side effects that he believes should help people determine that these medications are not worth taking. However, none of these side effects are worse than the effects some one may have with out the medicine. Kluger et al lacks evidence and does not have logic to their argument. His opinion is built into the article and less fact. He does not show any sort of evidence to show the dangers of these medications, infact he will just give examples of success stories. In giving these success stories he mocks them with a statement belittling the individual for having to depend on stimulant medication. The authors are clearly not going about the mature way and taking away from the serious nature of the topic, making the argument more ill-logical. He will state; children should not take these medications for example; but not give any other alternatives to a matter that is very prevalent and that effect’s many.

The author et al is clearly biased against those who need stimulant medications. It is their feeling that people should not need to take medication. They state all the reasons they should not partake in medication but is blind to see all the reasons they may need medication to stabilize their life. Also, they attempt to give an alternative of therapy for things like depression, or anxiety, which is sometimes aided by prescription medication. Kluger et al give these alternatives but ignores giving any other options to medications for ADD or ADHD because there are not any. Another point in his argument, he will give examples of young people who are...

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