Medicine In The First World War

1314 words - 6 pages

World War One, in its own time, was the most destructive war Earth itself had ever seen, and this was due to the new technology. “There are two groups of people in warfare – those organized to inflict and those organized to repair wounds – and there is little doubt but that in all wars, and in this one in particular, the former have been better prepared for their jobs.” There were many advancements, disadvantages, and foundations involving medicine in World War I. The assassination of Franz Ferdinand on June 28, 1914 started the war, and things spiraled out of control from there. With there being so many existing alliances with countries all over, almost all of Europe became involved. Eventually two sides emerged which were the Central Powers and the Allies. America had tried to stay out of the war, but when Russia backed out in 1917 America slipped in.
As America became involved we realized our medical strategy was practically non-existent, so we copied France and Britain’s plans. Our new medical strategy still contained problems that were in need of fixing. Some of these problems included sanitation and blood loss. Sanitation levels were dangerously low, baths were rare (as was laundering) , and the drinking water was contaminated with who-knows-what. But, we did know that this was causing rapidly-spreading diseases throughout camps. When a soldier would suffer a wound or was operated on there was often a decent portion of blood lost. But fear not, for solutions to these problems were soon discovered!
Sanitation was strengthened by finding local wells and getting clean pure freshwater, incinerating trash or dangerous materials, and by recruiting veterinarians to keep safe-to-eat food handy. Also, blood baths were created in order to store blood so that soldiers could gain blood using the newly designed method called blood transfusion. The blood for these transfusions were stored in flasks in an ice cooler which ensured the blood to last for awhile.
Another invention that was put to use in World War I was the x-ray. Marie Curie, a scientist who discovered radiation some years before the war, realized that x-rays could save many soldiers’ lives. This machine would emit radiation with rays that could travel through the body towards a soldier which would let doctors see if any existing injuries are there. An x-ray would allow doctors to see wounds that otherwise would have been almost impossible to notice like bone fractures, shrapnel, and bullets. This dedicated woman raised enough money to provide at least a dozen of the machines to the battlefront.
While some soldiers were able to make it to help on their own, how did the soldiers that could not make it themselves get to the “safety” of the hospitals?
Hospitals use a system to prioritize their patients in order to save supplies and resources. First are the soldiers with small wounds who are cared for and then sent back out to fight. Next come those who require transportation to a more...

Find Another Essay On Medicine in the First World War

The First World War Essay

7479 words - 30 pages complacency. Even those who predicted with chilling accuracy the murderous nature of First World War battlefields, such as the Polish banker Jan Bloch, expected the war to be short. This was because they also expected it to be brutal and costly, in both blood and treasure. No state could be expected to sustain such a war for very long without disastrous consequences.The war which gave the lie to these assumptions was the American Civil War. This had

The First World War Essay

1220 words - 5 pages The First World War c) The Following were equally important reasons why the stalemate on the Western Front was finally broken: new technology like the tank the American entry into the war the blockading of German ports the German offensive in March 1918 Explain how far you agree with this statement. All of the reasons suggested above do play a part in why the stalemate on the Western Front was

The First World War (WWI)

716 words - 3 pages to the armistice terms. At 11 A.M. on November 11, 1918- the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month, World War One ended.            World War one impacted the United States in many ways. Until this time, the United States had not really been in such an huge war. It showed how the Americans could really pull together to win. It also affected the economy. During the war, the economy boosted because of the need for weapons and artillery, and for the first time, women were allowed to join the union and work in the factories.

The First World War (WWI)

3235 words - 13 pages new, unpredictable socialist state, the first of its kind in the world. The Austro-Hungarian Empire was dismantled by the peace treaty, but in fact had already fallen apart; in its place were a patchwork of small independent states arguing over their borders. The Ottoman Empire also did not survive the war. Europe in 1918 was far less economically dominant and far more politically disorganized than it had been in 1914. Unexpected Result #4

Medicine in the Civil War

711 words - 3 pages Medicine In The Civil WarThose medical professionals who look back now at the techniques of Civil War doctors and hospitals are often found to be appalled. In our current eyes, medical professionals were untrained, uneducated, and frankly, stupid. The common medicines of the Civil War are now viewed by medical professionals as poisonous, lethal, and definitely dangerous. It is a statistical fact that more soldiers in the Civil War died from

The Somme: Heroism and Horror in the First World War

3115 words - 12 pages in the First World War. In his book he attempts to pay tribute to the soldiers who fought and fell in the battle. To do this he uses excerpts from diary entries, letters and poetry written by the soldiers on the front lines to give the reader a first-hand account of what the soldiers were thinking and feeling while fighting. Gilbert is able to effectively portray the horror of the Somme and reduce the anonymity of the fallen by sharing stories

The First World War and Women's Suffrage in Britain

1733 words - 7 pages what extent did the First World War lead to the accomplishment of the women’s suffrage movement of Britain in 1928? Two of the sources used in the essay, The Women’s Suffrage: a short history of a great Movement by Millicent Garrett Fawcett, and The cause: a short history of the women's movement in Great Britain By Ray Strachey, are evaluated for their origin, purpose, value and limitations. This investigation will consider the role of women

Letter From a Soldier in the First World War

1914 words - 8 pages Letter From a Soldier in the First World War Dearest Mother, I hope this letter reaches you as many others who have sent letters have not had their letters reach their intended destination, I also apologise for not writing to you sooner, although finding time to

The Origins of the First World War

2048 words - 8 pages The Origins of the First World War The study of diplomatic history has led to many different theories on the origins of the First World War. Each historian focuses on different aspects of the events preceding the war. In viewing them from a different time periods, many come to radically different conclusions. For example, the theory of German responsibility proposed directly after the war was soon revised with the

America and The First World War

498 words - 2 pages The First World War was a conflict between the triple entente which included, the United Kingdom, the Russian empire, and France, and the triple alliance which included Austria-Hungary, the Ottoman Empire, and Germany. The assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria-Hungary by a Serbian nationalist sparked the conflict, because both countries had alliances with other nations, the war grew and spread over the world. The United States

Causes of the First World War

1399 words - 6 pages In general, when people talk about the causes of the First World War they think of the obvious one - the assassination of Archduke Francis Ferdinand. This clearly was the main spark to the war, but not many know the underlying reasons, that happened far before June 28th, 1914. For the previous fifty years before World War I, there were heightened feelings of nationalism which developed into the need for increased imperialism, militarism, and

Similar Essays

The Change Of Medicine And Healthcare Throughout The First World War

1200 words - 5 pages Change in Medicine and Healthcare throughout the First World WarBy: Tonko van LeeuwenTable of ContentsTitle Page - 1Introduction - 2Narrative & Analysis - 2, 3Sources - 4Conclusion - 4Bibliography - 4IntroductionFor a long period of time, proper healthcare and medicine was unheard of in war. It wasn't until recently, starting with World War 1, that a greater amount of care was put into keeping soldiers alive. With the massive amount of

Cloning In Twenty First Century Medicine Essay

3342 words - 13 pages Cloning in Twenty-first Century Medicine In 1997 a shocking announcement was made to the world. Scottish scientist Dr. Ian Wilmont revealed that he had successfully cloned an entire sheep. This announcement brought a realization that cloning was no longer a dream or a figment of the imagination, and it immediately became one of the most debatable topics in the world. Discussions began concerning the ethical problems as well as the

Usa's Involvement In The First World War

722 words - 3 pages USA's Involvement in The First World War There were two main events that led to the USA entering the First World War. They are: · The German decision to wage war on any form of shipping near Britain and the mistake of attacking American vessels with American civilians on board. · The 'Zimmermann Telegram'. The Germans declared the sea around Britain a 'War Zone' and made the excuse that anything within

The First World War Essay

1294 words - 5 pages The First World War The First World War began as a spark and exploded into a merciless blood bath of money, power, and land. The little spark began in the mountainous Balkans of southeastern Europe where small state-sized nations argued back and forth. For hundreds of years many of these small nations were held under the gripping powers of Turkey, Russia, and Austria-Hungary. It started in the capital of Bosnia, Sarajevo. Bosnia was also