Mental Disorders Essay

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Stephen King and Carina Chocano are both horror authors that address the mental disorders of the people of today. Stephen King, author of "Why We Crave Horror Movies" argues that people are mentally ill because they choose to watch horror movies even though they know they are going to be scared. The author of "How Tabloid Trainwrecks Are Reinventing Gothic Literature", Carina Chocano, argues that celebrities of this time are becoming similar to Gothic literature characters in order to raise their fame value. These two pieces both illustrate that people crave the feeling of darkness and terror. King and Chocano both argue, through the use of examples, that people of today use fear as a source of entertainment and it is also a physiological and social purpose of the horror gothic genre.
In both pieces, "Why We Crave Horror Movies" and "How Tabloid Trainwrecks Are Reinventing Gothic Literature" psychological evidence is used depicting the gothic genre affecting individual’s health. Stephen King writes in his piece about individual's mental health, “It [fear] urges us to put away our more civilized and adult penchant for analysis and to become children again…” (paragraph 7, “Why We Crave Horror Movies”) The author claims that people want the adrenaline and mindset of when they were children watching horror movies. This affects an individual's mental health because they are scaring and forcing themselves to watch scary movies into order to be put in a different state of mind as if they were children again. People crave the feeling of being children again because they want to go back to the careless, worry-free and simple life similar to a child’s life. They want to be freed from the stress of work and life even if the freedom only lasts a couple of hours. Meanwhile, Carina Chocano writes “The girl [Lindsay Lohan], meanwhile has taken up residence in a gloomy and most certainly haunted chateau...she experiences a series of mysterious affiliations and is repeatedly institutionalized...to gain control over her estate and mental health.” (paragraph 2 "How Tabloid Trainwrecks Are Reinventing Gothic Literature") This specific quote depicts how celebrities are risking their mental health for fame because people would much rather watch a celebrity lose control of her life and go mad rather than actually watch what she is really famous for (movies, tv, music, etc.). Chocano continues to state that celebrities have to be institutionalized to gain back control of their lives. An example would be Lindsay Lohan when she was repeatedly put into rehab to seize control of her addiction dilemmas. The multiple rehab stints all “coincidentally” led to the actress “regaining” control of...

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