Milkman's Transformation In Toni Morrison's Song Of Solomon

686 words - 3 pages

Milkman's Transformation in Toni Morrison's Song of Solomon

Milkman experiences many changes in behavior throughout the novel Song of Solomon. Until his early thirties most would consider him self centered, or even self-loathing. Until his maturity he is spoiled by his mother Ruth and sisters Lena and Corinthian because he is a male. He is considered wealthy for the neighborhood he grew up in and he doesn't socialize because of this.

As a result of his spoiled childhood Milkman takes women for granted. He doesn't consider how his actions affect them. This is shown when he realizes he is bored with his cousin Hagar, whom he has been using for his sexual pleasure for years. Instead of buying her a Christmas gift he gives her cash and a thank you note. He thanks her for everything she has done for him and considers the relationship over. Hagar becomes obsessed with killing Milkman. She makes several attempts to take his life but fails because of her love for him. Her last attempt to kill him is when he is hiding from her in his only friend, Guitar?s room. Hagar tries to stab him but after she sees his face she cannot. Milkman tells her to stab herself and says, ?Why don?t you do that? Then all your problems will be over.?[pg 130] This portrays how Milkman is cold hearted towards the opposite sex.

Milkman?s journey into manhood begins when he is in his thirties. He has been thriving for financial independence since he began working for his father. He also wants to escape from his family ties. Milkman and Guitar steal a bag of what they believe is gold from his aunt Pilate?s house. They are arrested and find only human bones and rocks not gold in the bag, which essentially destroys his sense of flight. His father Macon and aunt Pilate go to the jail to get them released. Pilate performed an aunt Jemima act to assist in their release. Guitar is ashamed of her act but Milkman feels honored ?but the fact that she was both...

Find Another Essay On Milkman's Transformation in Toni Morrison's Song of Solomon

The Importance of Names in Toni Morrison’s Song Of Solomon

891 words - 4 pages The Importance of Names in Toni Morrison’s Song Of Solomon Toni Morrison’s award-winning novel Song of Solomon is full of very interesting, deep symbolism. Macon Dead III, nicknamed “Milkman,” is a very symbolic character throughout the novel. His character is not only symbolic, for so is his name. Also, Milkman’s paternal aunt, Pilate, has an extremely significant and symbolic role in the novel. To her father, she represents the child

A Sick Love in Toni Morrison´s Song of Solomon

1441 words - 6 pages In Song of Solomon, Toni Morrison constantly shifts the setting of the novel, tone, style and theme to frame Hagar’s character in the novel as a round character revealing her weaknesses due to a love obsession also foreshadowing her upcoming decay. Hagar being one of the central characters of the story is also a very contradictory character who as a child was an independent, intelligent, realistic and unattached girl with the freedom that her

"Song of Solomon" by Toni Morrison.

715 words - 3 pages "Flight in the Song of Solomon"Throughout literature it has been common for authors to use allusions to complement frequent motifs in their work. In Toni Morrison's Song of Solomon, Milkman learns that his desire to fly has been passed down to him from his ancestor Solomon. As Milkman is figuring out the puzzle of his ancestry, he realizes that when Solomon tried to take his youngest son, Jake, flying with him, he dropped him and Jake never

Definitions of Self in Community in Morrison's Sula and Song of Solomon

7007 words - 28 pages Definitions of Self In Community in Sula and Song of Solomon        "In that place, where they tore the nightshade and blackberry patches from their roots to make room for the Medallion City Golf Course, there once was a neighborhood" (Sula 1). Toni Morrison begins the novel Sula with these powerful words, describing more than a physical place, but a spiritual place where a community once stood. She begins with the destruction of the

The Juxtaposition of Ruth Foster and Pilate Dead in Toni Morrison’s Song of Solomon

1165 words - 5 pages Toni Morrison juxtaposes Ruth Foster and Pilate Dead, in Song of Solomon, to highlight the separate roles they play in the protagonist Milkman’s journey. Early in the novel Morrison, uses the juxtaposition of Ruth Foster and Pilate dead, when she tells of the flight of Mr. Robert Smith from Mercy Hospital. Ruth Foster, not yet described as such, is known as the “dead doctor’s daughter” (5). During this scene her insignificance is made clear

Themes in Song Of Solomon

2194 words - 9 pages , Wilfred D., and Clenora Hudson- Weems. Toni Morrison. New York, NY: Twayne Publishers, 1990. 53-78. Print. Demetrakopoulos, Stephanie A. Modern Critical Interpretations: Toni Morrison's Song of Solomon. Philadelphia, PA: Chelsea House Publishers, 1999. 41-56. Print. Hernandez, Krystle. "The Motif of Flight in Song of Solomon, by Toni Morrison." n. pag. Web. 9 May 2010. . Garnick, Vivian. "Into the Dark Heart of Childhood." Village Voice 29 August, 1977: p. 41. Print.

Essay on Control in Song of Solomon

1036 words - 4 pages Fight for Control in Song of Solomon     The idea of complete independence and indifference to the surrounding world, symbolized by flying, stands as a prominent concept throughout Toni Morrison's novel Song of Solomon. However, the main character Milkman feels that this freedom lies beyond his reach; he cannot escape the demands of his family and feel fulfilled at the same time. As Milkman's best friend Guitar says through the novel

Essay on Names in Song of Solomon

1520 words - 6 pages The Importance of Names in Song of Solomon      Abstract:  In Toni Morrison's Song of Solomon, names have great implication.  Language is extremely personal and deeply rooted in culture.  Names are an integral part of language, and they help to establish identity, define personality, and show ownership through formal and informal usage.   " 'Tis but thy name that is my enemy; / Thou art thyself, though not a Montague. / What's

Essay on Identity in Song of Solomon

2172 words - 9 pages Beloved, Morrison's unique style of ending a novel with no finalization, only enhances the content and tickles the imagination. Evidence of the influence of Zora Neale Hurston is sprinkled liberally throughout the story. In addition to folklore and mythology, Song of Solomon is also rife with the cold, hard facts of reality. Did Milkman actually become airborne or was he merely a man, consistently trying to escape reality?   Toni Morrison's

Mtif Of Trees In Toni Morrison's Beloved

2027 words - 8 pages trees help bring good and calmness. Morrison's indirect implications of tree's soothing nature has strong symbolism, representing the comfort and calmness to readers. While Toni Morrison mainly uses tree imagery as a message of serenity and comfort, she uses her characters' responses to trees to show that perhaps when one lives through a horrific ordeal like slavery, people find comfort in the natural world for its calmness and seemingly harmless

The Double Minority in Song of Solomon

829 words - 3 pages Morrison's Song of Solomon, the African American female characters demonstrate the impact of having a double minority status. The female characters in Song of Solomon exhibit the difficulties for double minorities. Macon Dead and his family are a prominent, middle-class African American family. Although slavery has been over for a long time, the Dead's house has a feel of a prison. Macon seems to be the master of his house, and the women in his

Similar Essays

Time In Toni Morrison's "Song Of Solomon".

1751 words - 7 pages The history of Black America is one that has been stolen, lost and largely forgotten over the past two centuries. Through slavery and more recently the Apartheid-like era of Jim Crow laws, black history has been clouded over with oppression and hatred. Toni Morison's Song of Solomon is an attempt to explore the muddled path of history through the confused life of Milkman Dead. Morrison places Milkman in a world full of characters that are

Destructive Love In Toni Morrison's Song Of Solomon

1766 words - 7 pages Destructive Love in Toni Morrison's Song of Solomon When an emotion is believed to embody all that brings bliss, serenity, effervescence, and even benevolence, although one may believe its encompassing nature to allow for generalizations and existence virtually everywhere, surprisingly, directly outside the area love covers lies the very antithesis of love: hate, which in all its forms, has the potential to bring pain and destruction. Is it

Racism In Toni Morrison's Song Of Solmon

1220 words - 5 pages Racism in Toni Morrison's Song of Solmon Milkman is born on the day that Mr. Smith kills himself trying to fly; Milkman as a child wanted to fly until he found out that people could not. When he found, "that only birds and airplanes could fly&emdash;he lost all interest in himself" (9). The novel Song of Solomon is about an African American man nicknamed Milkman. This novel, by Nobel Prize winner Toni Morrison was first published in 1977

Listening To Women, Being A Man. Speaks Of Toni Morrison's "Song Of Solomon"

1666 words - 7 pages In Toni Morrison's Song of Solomon, Milkman Dead becomes a man by learning to respect and to listen to women. In the first part of the novel, he emulates his father, by being deaf to women's wisdom and women's needs, and casually disrespecting the women he should most respect. He chooses to stray from his father's example and leaves town to obtain his inheritance and to become a self-defined man. From Circe, a witch figure, he is inspired to be