Minority Populations In Special Education Essay

873 words - 4 pages

Authors Aldridge and Goldman, and Anthony Rebora argued that despite monumental improvements following passage of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) in 1975, issues persist around the disproportionate provision of services to minority ethnic groups in special education (SPED) programs. While author Rebora, in his article Keeping Special Ed in Proportion, provided an uncommon look at how the imbalance of service is actually determined, authors Aldridge and Goldman competently described this trend from a multicultural perspective in the article The Over and Underrepresentation in Special Education Programs. In the same way that both articles looked at the constancy of this trend over the last three decades, both articles also concluded with a focus on problem solving measures in the classroom, and at the school and district levels as well.
Following the persistence of this issue further, author Anthony Rebora inferred that cultural biases inside the classroom perpetuated the constancy of disproportionate provision of SPED services to minority ethnic groups (2011). Similarly, authors Aldridge and Goldman, in their article The Over and Underrepresentation in Special Education Programs, suggested that mistaken beliefs in regards to the design and implementation of multicultural education programs continue to exacerbate this issue in just the same way (2010). Initially, Aldridge and Goldman asserted that the focus of these programs “is on understanding and learning to negotiate cultural diversity…” but later on stated that multicultural pedagogy “seeks to achieve fair and equal educational opportunities for all students, particularly minorities and the economically disadvantaged” (2010). This last statement, in my opinion, is a direct contrast to the authors’ previous assertion. It left me feeling that, ultimately, because of the concerns for underprivileged minority groups, culturally responsive instruction would necessarily default to the study of those minority cultures. I, on the other hand, would like to join a conversation that explores the three areas authors Aldridge and Goldman stated are “especially obvious” for “cultural differences…learning styles, communication styles, and language differences” (2010). I think if educators were to focus on these three areas during “faculty book-study groups” as suggested by author Rebora (2011), the focus might return to “stressing basic similarities” and ”equal educational opportunities for all students” (Aldridge and Goldman, 2010).
In the light of educational opportunities, both authors provided quality suggestions for the actualization of “good race relations, academic achievement, and personal development among students” (Rebora, 2011). Because, as authors Aldridge and Goldman submitted, the attributes of learning traits among minority populations are diverse, these populations rely heavily on progressive...

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