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Miranda V Arizona Essay

1002 words - 5 pages

The Fifth and Sixth Amendments like every other law out there is used in ways other than what it was initially for, by being interpreted by stretch provisions according to what feels right. What was it meant for? The brutality to suspects who we're being accused of their so called "wrong doing" dictated what would eventually change the way we work suspects. The police force had not been given what proper provisions to follow when interrogating suspects of criminal charges giving them disadvantages on many occasions though out the course of law. Many suspects essentially didn't know there rights along with police officers which in turn would cause a huge confusion. What are the rights that ...view middle of the document...

Ernesto Miranda, who had been convicted of kidnapping and rape, had a similar conflicting situation like the Escobedo V. Illinois case for, he was not given proper guidelines during interrogation. Miranda was also “cut from the outside world” while being interrogated and had “resulted in a signed, written confession”. Miranda was not given a lawyer during his “two hour” interrogation by police officers and was also not provided adept knowledge of his rights. Miranda was infringed of his Fifth and Sixth Amendment rights; even though, he was supposedly well aware of his rights because of his numerous run in with the law. Soon after he was taken to a hearing and was still denied a lawyer violating the Sixth Amendment and soon after it the case then was sought unfair and then taken to the Supreme Court where he was finally provided a lawyer by the state.
The state of Arizona had its reason to not state Miranda’s rights to be silent because he had been in trouble by the law so many times that the police felt no need to keep restating his rights. Also the state argued that they had correctly given Miranda proper imprisonment and direction to how to proceed things. It was also stated that he “willingly” confessed to his crimes. In addition, the court did not want the court to “cripple” the police force on with the trial and that it was “just” that Miranda had been convicted for what he had done along with his sentencing for twenty-thirty years.
The majority rule for the Miranda V. Arizona case had saw that the system of the Fifth and Sixth Amendments were broken and that there was no clear direction to the rights of suspects, questions were raised. [What are those questions?] The perception was that prior to interrogation suspects were supposed to know their “right to remain silent” but, in many cases suspects did not have any idea because of illiteracy and it not being common knowledge to the suspects. Also depending on social...

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