Money, Power, Class In F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby

658 words - 3 pages

Money, power, and social classes all played a huge role in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby. Throughout the book Fitzgerald develops his characters based on their settings and each role’s purpose is about money and wealth status. Each character also has their own power over one another because of their money and social ranking.
For example Daisy Buchannan, who is known for being careless and free, has a lot of power over other characters. Daisy’s power over Gatsby is shown through their romantic relationship. Though Gatsby is known as powerful, through Daisy’s eyes, Gatsby was a poor man. Gatsby would do anything for Daisy and one way of showing that is how Gatsby bought the house across the bay from Daisy’s house. Having the house across the bay, Gatsby throws big wild parties to see if Daisy will ever show up. Another way Daisy’s power is shown over Gatsby is when Gatsby sits in a bush outside of the Buchannan’s house to wait for Daisy to tell Tom she loves Gatsby, but she never comes out. Daisy also has power over Tom Buchannan because even though Tom had a mistress named Myrtle in New York, Tom never left Daisy for Myrtle. “Daisy! Daisy! Daisy! Ill whenever I want to” (41) is a line that Myrtle said right before Tom Broke Myrtle’s nose with his hand. This shows that Tom doesn’t want Daisy to be a part of his affair. Daisy also has power over Myrtle because Myrtle is jealous that Tom won’t leave Daisy for her. Tom is wont leave Daisy for Myrtle because she is already married and he loves Daisy more. Daisy’s power over Nick is simple. Nick is mesmerized with every detail that is Daisy.
Another character that has power is Tom Buchannan. His power is mostly over George, Gatsby and Daisy. Daisy states “That’s what I get for marrying a brute of a man” (67) because Tom has a lot of physical power over daisy....

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