Morality Of The Decision Made In Claire Mc Carthy's Dog Lab

751 words - 4 pages

Sometimes one must make a decision that puts to question what they believe is right, what they believe is wrong, and what they are willing to give up to make the decision. In the essay “Dog Lab” by Claire McCarthy, she recounts a story from when she was in medical school and her teacher gives them a choice on whether or not to participate in an experiment to learn about the vascular system. This experiment involves taking a perfectly healthy dog and putting him under anesthesia, cutting them open and pumping them full of different chemicals to see what they do to the heart. And then putting the dog down. Some would say that the decision is very cut and dry, either you do the experiment or you don't. But a very important thing to factor in is ho incredibly dedicated to her school work she was, in beginning of the essay she tries to explain why she became so focused in school with the phrase “My study now carried responsibility”. And she was correct, if there was ever a time that she wouldhave needed to buckle down and focus on her studies it would have been then. But she also tells us that though she was loving every minute of her work that she didnt quite feel human at times “Sometimes I felt like a student in the best sense of the word; other times I felt like an automation”.

On the day that the experiment is announced the author states that her teacher says that no one is required to participate. He points out that it is an excellent learning experience but that some people do not agree with this particular method of learning and that if they chose not to participate it would not affect their grades. But the author was so obsessed with her studies and getting the A that she doesn't believe him. She says “even if he didnt incorporate the lab into our grades, I was worried there would be some reference to it in the final exam, some sneaky way he would bring it up.” It is this mentality that eventually leads to her deciding to participate in the lab.

Now, one...

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