This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

More Powerful Than A Stereotype Essay

847 words - 4 pages

Everyone is familiar with or has personally encountered a stereotype. Common examples of stereotypes are: Americans are lazy, Irish are miserable drunks, men are messy, and blondes are dumb. People of all races, ages, genders, cultures, professions and any other way that a person could be classified have been targeted and regarded either positively or negatively at some point in their lives. The reality is that there is a stereotype for just about everyone and everything, so that no one is safe from labels. Stereotypes have laid claim to every person as prey and dealt the consequences out with indifference. Labels and false impressions were common to me as an adopted, blonde girl as well as my older adopted Native American brother. Sherman Alexie – Coeur d’Alene Indian, poet, novelist, short-story author, screenwriter, film director, and comedian – expresses his own experiences with stereotypes and his own heroic ability to overcome those constraints in the short story “Superman and Me”. I agree with the idea that Alexie’s story insinuates the misconceptions illustrated by stereotypes can not only become judgments that people use as personal limitations, but also used as inspirations to surpass those expectations.
“Superman and Me” is a short autobiographical story that tells of the author’s love of books at a very early age and the disapproving typecast he received for his love of reading and ambition of education. Alexie describes the passionate fondness his father had for books and reading, and decided as a small child that he wanted that enthusiasm as well. Alexie taught himself to read quickly and was incredibly reading the novel Grapes of Wrath by the time he was five years old. Superman ironically was the comic book that Alexie taught himself to read from. By looking at the comic panels in the Superman comics, Alexie was able discern that:
In one panel, Superman breaks through a door. His suit is red, blue and yellow. The brown door shatters into any pieces. I look at the narrative above the picture. I cannot read the words, but I assume it tells me that “Superman is breaking down the door.” Aloud, I pretend to read the words and say, “Superman is breaking down the door.” Words, dialogue, also float out of Superman’s mouth. Because he is breaking down the door, I assume he says, “I am breaking down the door.” Once again, I pretend to read the words and say aloud, “I am breaking down the door.” In this way, I learned to read. (Alexie 209)
Like...

Find Another Essay On More Powerful than a Stereotype

In what ways and why are the Committees of the US Congress so much more Powerful than the Committees of the House of Commons?

1141 words - 5 pages seems that the overriding factor is the actual roles and the powers given to the committees in each system to perform these roles that gives the committees in congress considerably more power than their counterparts in the house of commons. Their powers being, the ability to stop or delay a proposed bill before it reaches the house of Reps or the senate, a power totally devoid of british committees, whose only powers it seems lie in their ability to amend bills. A power also enjoyed by the committees of congress. This we can say is decisive evidence that the committees of the US Congress are much more powerful in the way they can determine national and state politics.

Build A More Powerful Memory Essay

704 words - 3 pages BUILD A MORE POWERFUL MEMORY The Two Basic Steps in Remembering The first step: Effective studying and remembering require, first, that you organize the material to be learned. Organization means preparing study notes made up of headings and subheadings, definitions and examples, enumerations, and other important points. The very process of organizing material and condensing it to the main points will help you understand and remember it.The

More Than a Prize

555 words - 2 pages Carnival games should not reward animals as prizes because information concerning care isn't provided. Frustrated people are stuck with an animal they know nothing about. Because of this lack of knowledge, the animal will more than likely die. The majority of people do not enjoy having their pet die.A successful pitch of a baseball wins you a green anole, a small lizard that requires specific needs. You're handed your prize in nothing more than

More Than A Homemaker

1366 words - 5 pages for women were always limited and the only thing that women could do was to become housewives. People were very conservative to the idea of the traditional role of a man and a woman. Men are always the provider and women are always the caregiver. Men held more power because of the fact that they earned money. It is hard for people to lose the conservative idea because the idea was around since the beginning of the era. So, rightful place for woman

More Than A Uniform

1456 words - 6 pages whether the soldiers were wearing a blue uniform or a gray uniform. They helped all for the sake of the mothers, sweethearts, and wives everywhere. Sarah was rewarded for her changed attitude with a renewed relationship with her son, Billy. The rest of the town was rewarded with a better united feeling with women everywhere. This town had learned that all men are the same. They learned that choosing which man to care for was based on more than a uniform.

Islam More Than A Religion

1379 words - 6 pages Islam More Than A ReligionISLAM MORE THAN A RELIGIONDespite its huge following around the world and the growing Muslim communities in the United States, Islam is foreign to most Americans who are familiar with Christianity or Judaism. Because most Americans know little or nothing about Islam, they have many misconceptions about Muslim beliefs and rituals. The negative image many people in the United States and Europe have of Islam and the Muslim

More Than a Bus Driver

2269 words - 10 pages characteristic that educated experienced coaches share with inexperienced coaches is, they both want to see their athletes succeed and achieve their goals. As discussed earlier each athlete has individual needs that require implementing individuality and specificity. Coaches need to understand that more than just accommodating their physical needs, athletes also require mental support. A coaches behavior is a big deciding factor in classifying them

More than just a Major

1214 words - 5 pages place for example, every time I complete one class worth of homework I can take a nap or watch Netflix. That should give me some motivation along with me needing to make good grades, because after I graduate I get to have my dream job, and that’s the goal. My third fear is more complicated than the other two for this one its not just about school its also about life, and in life we make mistakes and aren’t good enough sometimes. That is something

More Than Just A Place

1016 words - 4 pages More Than Just A Place It takes some people a long time to get there and others no time at all. It is a place where a person should feel relaxed and comfortable, in harmony with their environment. It is a place of refuge and its doors should always be open. It can be where you go to after a long day of work or what you land on to win the game for your team. The Merriam Webster Dictionary defines it as “one’s place of residence, the social unit

More than a Radical Revolution

906 words - 4 pages found only in a republic of equal, active, and independent citizens.” America’s radical change also allowed the common people to be voters and help determine their society, also an unheard of change to government and society. Gordon Wood uses this three-phase transition to prove that the American Revolution was more than a conservative rebellion but a true social revolution that perpetually changed America forever. Wood shares his personal

The Work of WWII That Evokes A More Powerful Reaction

1345 words - 5 pages portraying the events occurring at the time of World War Two, conversely, the excerpt from “Night” by Elie Wiesel seems to evoke a more powerful reaction because of its emotional content, the fact of it being a first-hand account, and its abundant use of imagery. Emotion is what drives the human race, and is one of the most effective ways to convey to a person what is truly going on in a given circumstance. In the excerpt from “The Speeches

Similar Essays

Character More Powerful Than A Locomotive: Looks Like A Job For Superman

1317 words - 5 pages among other Superheros? Sure, he's faster than a speeding bullet, and can jump buildings in a single bound, but honestly, in the world of imaginary, who can't? I believe that it is something bigger than just Superman, in fact I think that Clark Kent, Superman's alter-ego, was just as important and monumental than Superman himself. Superman is the embodiment of everything someone should be; he was smart, athletic, and courageous, but more

"Words Are More Powerful And Treacherous Than We Think" J.P.Sartre

624 words - 2 pages language for ages. Many words possess a double meaning, hence if we would like to express something we ought to remember about choosing an appropriate context in order to shun being wrongly-understandable.It is my contention that words are more powerful than we think that they are, moreover the vast majority of us do not realize of both significance and how treacherous words are. I am sure that everybody has ever been in touch with being wrongly

Our Fantasies Can Be More Powerful Than Reality,

994 words - 4 pages Whether fantasy can be more powerful than the universally accepted version of ‘reality’ is debatable. Phillip Dick had once claimed, ‘reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn’t go away,’ suggesting the existence of things that are fundamentally and inevitably real. Conversely, Albert Einstein’s proposal that reality itself is ‘merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one,’ also seems valid. Perhaps then, the extent to

More Powerful Than The Government? A Review Of The Federal Reserve

2310 words - 9 pages would cause to great of a strain on the economy and demanded more independence. The accords agreement allowed Fed independence from having to protect government bonds and complete control of monetary policy. The accords also laid out three responsibilities for the Fed, maximum employment, price stability and controlled long-term interest rates. The extension of power to the Fed following the accords increased independence and allowed for reduced