This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Mothers, Daughters And Common Ground In Amy Tan’s The Joy Luck Club

1207 words - 5 pages

Mothers, Daughters and Common Ground in Amy Tan’s The Joy Luck Club

Here is a journey that not only started "a thousand Li away", but from generations upon generations of tradition. The Joy Luck Club travels over time and continents to present the background and turmoil of eight amazing women. All of these women have had to deal with the issues of culture, gender, and family, each in their own way, yet all similarly. Amy Tan dedicates her novel to her mother with the comment "You asked me once what I would remember… This, and much more." Each of the mothers in Tan's novel wanted to teach their daughters the lessons learned in China while giving them the comforts of America. But language and culture barriers diverge the women until they were almost lost to each other. Each character had to take their own journey to finally understand what drove them apart and find their common ground.

Each Mother brought baggage with her across the pacific. They wanted to teach their daughters from all of their pain and suffering, but were never able to communicate the complexities of their life. Suyuan Woo struggles to explain herself to her daughter "'This feather may look worthless, but it comes from afar and carries with it all my good intentions.' And she waited, year after year, for the day she could tell her daughter this in perfect American English"(3). The journey that brought Suyuan to America was long and full of hardship. From the Japanese invasion of Kweilin were she lost her husband and had to leave her daughters, to her assimilation in America. Suyuan wanted to teach her daughter about these hardships so that she could understand the extent of her potential. " My mother believed you could be anything you wanted to be in America…America was were all my mother's hopes lie"(141). Suyuan wanted her daughter, Jing-Mei, to use the opportunity provided to her in America, were she would be valued for her accomplishments and not "by the loudness of her husbands belch"(3). An old Chinese man explained that when a son was born in China it was a "big happiness" but when a baby girl was born it could only be considered a "small happiness"(Small). Suyuan did not want this for her daughter.

Lindo Jong had a different struggle in China but a similar lesson to teach her daughter, Waverly. Lindo was promised to a man before she could speak, and by the time she was 12 was living the life of a Chinese wife. In order to avoid shaming her parents, Lindo had to become silent and subservient with her new family. On her wedding day, however, she recognized her strength.

And then I realized it was the first time I could see the power of the wind…I was strong. I was pure. I had genuine thoughts inside that no one could see…I was like the wind. I made a promise to myself: I would always remember my parents' wishes, but I would never forget myself (53).

She trusted herself and was able to escape the life that she had been shackled to. She brought this...

Find Another Essay On Mothers, Daughters and Common Ground in Amy Tan’s The Joy Luck Club

Power of the Mother and Daughter Relationship Amy Tan’s Joy Luck Club

1511 words - 6 pages Power of the Mother and Daughter Relationship Amy Tan’s Joy Luck Club In the novel, The Joy Luck Club, the author, Amy Tan, intricately weaves together the roles and experiences of Chinese mothers with their American born daughters. During a time of war, the mothers flee from China to America, leaving behind a past filled with secrets that unravel as their daughters mature. While sharing their difficulties, these mothers must be able to

Discuss how The Joy Luck Club deals with the generation gap between mothers and daughters

588 words - 2 pages do love each other, by quoting one of the mothers telling Jing - Mei "Your mother is in your bones" meaning that even though they had problems, there was still a part of her mother in her, acknowledging my point.To conclude, I opine that there is not much relevance in the generation gap between mother and daughter, it's more about the cultural difference, because, as you can see, mothers and daughters from the same culture don't differ as much as these do, they do have misunderstandings, but about less significant things such as cloth, relationships and food. Not about almost everything like the mothers and daughters in The Joy Luck Club did.

Joy Luck Club (Prove That The Daughters' Marriages Were Less Successful Than The Mothers)

665 words - 3 pages complications, because it is not possible to adopt Chinese culture and thinking according to the American style at the same time. That's what happened with the families in the book "Joy Luck Club", which resulted into major conflicts, and because of that the marriages of the daughters were less successful than the mother's. Although the mothers had more than one marriages in their lives, but that was not a result of lack of communication, or love

The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan

737 words - 3 pages , language can also be a bridge to connect them, for example, Suyuan and Canning fell in love while learning English together, and it is the daughters' ability to understand Chinese that lets them see their mothers' wisdom. The reader can very easily see that there are many cultural similarities and differences in between the two generations using those three cultural aspects. The search of identity and acceptance in American society is still a very huge topic today, but now not only in Asian cultures, but in races and ethnicities around the globe, and Amy Tan goes to express that in her book The Joy Luck Club.

Mother-Daughter Conflict in Amy Tan's The Joy Luck Club

2989 words - 12 pages careful not to pull in girls" (195,6). According to Anne P. Standley, "Kingston tells of her lifelong struggle to fashion an identity on her own terms and to draw sustenance from her Chinese culture while rejecting its sexist values" (165). For her part, Tan in Joy Luck Club illustrates the cultural differences between these two conflicting generations by alternating the voices of the mothers with those of the daughters. Four mothers with a

Amy Tan's "The Joy Luck Club"

2892 words - 12 pages In The Joy Luck Club, Amy Tan explores the different mother-daughter relationships between the characters, and at a lower level, relationships between friends, lovers, and even enemies. The mother-daughter relationships are most likely different aspects of Tan's relationship with her mother, and perhaps a figment of her imagination. In this book, she presents the conflicting views and the stories of both sides, providing the reader and

Amy Tan's The Joy Luck Club

1461 words - 6 pages Differences Between Daughters and Mothers There are numerous conditions in human life that mold people into who they presently are. A person's identity and way of thinking are influenced greatly due to their family's surroundings, and relationships they are involved in. In the novel, The Joy Luck Club, the characters are generic, in the sense that, although they are from different families, the problems and emotions experienced are similar. The

Amy Tan's The Joy Luck Club

1251 words - 5 pages Amy Tan's The Joy Luck Club Parents always want what is best for their children, regardless of culture or ethnicity. In The Joy Luck Club, by Amy Tan, and in "Life With Father" by Itabari Njeri, the parents express their parental methods upon their daughters. Children will all react differently to their parent's methods, as do Waverly, June, and Itabari, but they still share a common resentment for their parents. It is shown in the two

"The Joy Luck Club" by Amy Tan

862 words - 3 pages The Joy and Luck of the Family BrawlIn Amy Tan's "The Joy Luck Club", the characters always seem to be fighting. Usually it's a Chinese mother going for the throat of her daughter. The major conflicts in the book are caused by a clash of the strong willed Chinese, and revolutionary American cultures.Waverly's mom, Lindo, is the proud parent of a young chess prodigy. She takes great pride in Waverly's success at the art of chess. But a conflict

Search for Identity in Amy Tan's The Joy Luck Club

843 words - 3 pages  Search for Identity in The Joy Luck Club    "Imagine, a daughter not knowing her own mother!" And then it occurs to me. They are frightened. In me, they see their own daughters, just as ignorant, just as unmindful of all truths and hopes they have brought to America. They see daughters who grow impatient when their mothers talk in Chinese, who think they are stupid when they explain things in fractured English. (Tan 40

The Power of Love in Amy Tan's Joy Luck Club

1594 words - 6 pages The Power of Love in Amy Tan's Joy Luck Club      In Amy Tan's The Joy Luck Club, Four pairs of mothers and daughters embark on the journey that is life.  Each young woman comes to realize how valuable the relationships with their mothers are.  As each daughter learns from her mother, she goes through the sometimes-painful process of trying to understand her enigmatic mother.  To finally unravel the mystery surrounding their mothers

Similar Essays

Mothers And Daughters In Amy Tan’s The Joy Luck Club

1798 words - 7 pages Mothers and Daughters in Amy Tan’s The Joy Luck Club Throughout Amy Tan’s novel, The Joy Luck Club, the reader can see the difficulites in the mother-daughter relationships.  The mothers came to America from China hoping to give their daughters better lives than what they had.  In China, women were “to be obedient, to honor one’s parents, one’s husband, and to try to please him and his family,” (Chinese-American Women in American Culture

The Roles Of Culture, Mothers, And Daughters In Amy Tan's The Joy Luck Club

1340 words - 5 pages     "A mother is best. A mother knows what is inside of you," said An-Mei Hsu to her daughter Rose (188). And this is true for all four of the mothers in the Joy Luck Club, by Amy Tan. Unfortunately it was much more complicated than that, because the daughters had minds of their own, to a certain extent, minds that were part American. "The emphasis on honor, obedience, and loyalty among women are immense in this novel" (The Joy Luck Club: An

Improving Mother/Daughter Relationships In Amy Tan’s Joy Luck Club

1211 words - 5 pages like you.  Must be born this way” (Tan 232).  This quote completely proves the “like mother, like daughter” theory because just like Waverly and Jing-Mei, Suyuan and Lindo always compete with one another but not as directly as their daughters. In conclusion, Amy Tan’s The Joy Luck Club clearly illustrates not only Chinese mothers relationships with their American daughters but overall mother and daughter relationships.   This book shows us that

Motherly Love In Amy Tan’s Joy Luck Club

1503 words - 6 pages Motherly Love in Amy Tan’s Joy Luck Club A mother’s love for a daughter is an intense feeling; some times it can be very joyful or very painful.  Most mothers just want their daughters to have everything that they didn’t have, they try to give their daughter all their hopes and dreams.  The relationship between a mother and daughter should be one of the greatest relationships a woman can have with another woman. Some time a mother can push