Motivations For Deliberation Essay

947 words - 4 pages

In a deliberation, it is essential to be motivated by something to deliberate. There are certain characteristics that define deliberation as outlined in Gastil’s criteria, but an underlying question is why do people choose to take part on a deliberation? What makes us want to follow criteria stated by Gastil? In our recent class deliberations, it seems that in order to be motivated to deliberate a topic, we must have true personal stakes in the topic at hand. Being college students, we are living, breathing examples of this discussion. I feel as though if there had been a topic which none of us were interested in, the deliberation would have been a flop. Throughout the course of our ...view middle of the document...

This is what lit the fire for deliberation. With such majors, it's hard to find an "in-between." As a moderator, I was nervous going into the deliberation because I have never done it before. To my surprise, as soon as everyone was finished, the deliberation immediately began. It all started about how competitive mathematic and scientific majors are. As a psychology major I both understand, and yet took offense to how people think that science/math majors are far more important. I understand that yes, they may be more profitable but should they really get more "benefits?" It was one of the most fascinating things to hear from college students, a sort of "Who's Better Than Who?" and how much more important they say their major is. In a deliberation where some of the parties involved have a personal stake, they are more willing to argue their points or have an idea they adapt to meet all needs. Our group did an exceptional job with the deliberation because we all felt strongly about the subject we discussed and we all felt strongly about the topic. We tried to stick to mostly to what was on the National Issues Forum packet but the conversation quickly escalated beyond the guidelines, which could be seen as good or bad.
There is no doubt that we did not find a common ground, but I do not necessarily think this is a bad thing. We were all very passionate about the topic of Higher Education, and I commend whoever chose this topic. Topics such as scholarships, general education courses, etc. gave the most fuel to the fire. Although others felt more strongly about things, we all mostly agreed upon certain points. We must not only feel passionate about the issue, but we must feel like we have some sense of control and power to fix the issue. This...

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