Movie Essay A Comparison Of Satire In Voltaire's Candide And The Film Lexx

1176 words - 5 pages

Satire in Candide and Lexx

Voltaire's Candide is a story about a young man learning about the realities of the world; realities he never could have believed to happen in life because his education heavily involves the idea that this is the "best of all worlds." Salter Street Films' Lexx is a story about a group of misfit adventurers and the calamity that befalls them after they steal the Lexx, a Manhattan-sized insect with the ability to destroy planets. Though the two stories have more in common than one might expect, given the difference of medium, much more is different between the two, even with satire present in both

The first and most obvious difference between Candide and Lexx is the setting of the two. The Earth as visited by the Lexx is, in itself, unrealistic with its portrayal of everything we consider 'normal' being completely outlandish to the crew. It also follows that if the settings are drastically different, the characters must be as well. Kai is not only an assassin and last of the Brunnen-G, but he has been dead for six thousand years. Stanley Tweedle, captain of the Lexx, has seen enough while traveling on the giant insect to know that such is not the case. The characters between the two stories even journey with different methods; while the cast of Lexx travels through the Light and Dark Universes on an insect spaceship, the cast of Candide travels around the Earth on foot or by transportation such as boats. Even the crew of the Lexx travels around Earth not by such methods, but by using the giant Moths grown on their ship.

The second, and perhaps most important difference between Candide and Lexx is the methods by which the two stories satirize things. As typical of most modern day satire, Lexx is far more blatant in its approach. For instance, Lexx wastes no time telling us that Earth is in the center of the Dark Universe. The sexual innuendo that both display can illustrate this comparison very clearly, as the more R-rated scenes of Lexx do not try to hide themselves at all. Certainly, with Xev of B3K being a Love Slave, these things are meant to be obvious. Even beyond that, she manages to escape the mental Love Slave programming and puts the robot head 790 in place of herself. 790 then becomes a naughty little pervert that will do anything to catch the love of his life, be it Xev or Kai.

As opposed to the setting of Lexx, the main characters in Candide start their exploits in the simple castle of Thunder-ten-thronckh and journey onward during Voltaire's era, a far cry from modern times. Most of Candide realistically portrays the world while the characters act in completely ludicrous fashion. Candide is an innocent young man on a journey, and his companions create quite the human ensemble. Dr. Pangloss believes everything is part of a greater plan, the 'best of all worlds.' It is ironic that the universe of Lexx treats time as a cycle with a beginning and an end, a...

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