Film Analysis: Twelve Angry Men

2027 words - 8 pages

The movie "Twelve Angry Men" is about a young man who is accused of stabbing his father to death. The twelve jurors have to decide whether the defendant is guilty or innocent. If the young man is found guilty, there is a mandatory death sentence (the jury needs to be unanimous in their decision). At the preliminary vote, eleven of the twelve jurors vote the young man guilty. Henry Fonda is the only one who voted the accused as not guilty because he doesn't want to send the defendant to the death penalty without discussing it. Throughout the movie, Henry uses various styles of leadership in which I will discuss further in the following section.Question 1:At the beginning, Henry uses the supporting style of leadership from Hersey and Blanchard's Situational Leadership framework. In this style, Henry demonstrates low task focus and high relationship focus. As mentioned previously, at the beginning of the deliberation process Henry is the only one who votes not guilty, everybody else voted guilty without really thinking about their decision. Henry wanted to talk about it before making a serious decision concerning a young man's life. Compared to other jurors, Henry was trying to create a discussion rather than an argument. He expressed no adherence to either position but wanted to discuss the case in an open-minded manner. Although other jurors got mad and started yelling, Henry stayed calmed throughout the situation and was a good listener. He was trying to find out why the other jurors voted guilty and trying to get their cooperation (this was seen when Henry was elaborating on the juror's explanations of their choice for voting guilty). As well, he was trying to motivate individuals within the group and keep them focused; however several jurors were not cooperating and there was a lack of commitment (although the jurors possess the competence to come to an agreement). They were constantly interrupting him, shouting, and at one point two jurors were playing 'tic-tac-toe'. They were not open-minded and didn't want to listen to what others had to say. Almost everyone in the room wanted to leave but in the end Henry was able to get others to reconsider their position. This leadership style was appropriate when comparing it to the group's readiness. Although the jurors were able to examine this case in greater details, they were refusing to do so and were not showing any commitment. Henry was able to persuade them to cooperate and participate (high focus on relationship) in which it led him into another leadership style approach; coaching.A second leadership style that was used by Henry was the coaching style. In this style, Henry demonstrates high task focus and high relationship focus. The jurors were somewhat willing to discuss the situation but Henry reinforced his suggestion of talking about it before making any final decision. The jury did have the competence to agree on a verdict but lacked commitment. They needed direction from the leader in...

Find Another Essay On Film Analysis: Twelve Angry Men

Twelve Angry Men Plot Essay

610 words - 2 pages Plot: “Twelve Angry Men” is an interesting and exciting jury-room confrontation in which an "open and shut case" becomes strenuous as twelve strangers scuffle for answers. The trial involves a nineteen-year-old boy, who is suspect of killing his father in a late-night altercation with an extraordinary knife. His fate now lies in the hands of 12 jurors, each with his own determination to solve the case and reveal the truth. As the

Twelve Angry Men Essay

644 words - 3 pages Twelve Angry Men is a very interesting play about an unfortunate young man, who was convicted of killing his dad. The worst part was, the young man was only nineteen, and his life was just starting. The jurors listened to all the evidence, then came the hard part, making the decision: guilty, or innocent. Eleven jurors said guilty and only one said innocent. There was a lot of peer pressure involved. I decided to write about different peer

Twelve Angry Men Juror Notes.

1100 words - 4 pages anything to do with it. The facts are supposed to determine the case."Examine this conflict and whether it is resolved or not?Twelve Angry Men is about the conflict between prejudice and logic• Prejudice - racism and discrimination• Logic - facts and thinking objectivelyThe matter is resolved in the actual court case but the matter is not resolved in American society.At the end of twelve angry men, the outcome of the trial is correct but

Tension in Reginald Rose's Twelve Angry Men

2071 words - 8 pages 'realtime' this is unlike most films where we are used to having gaps in time, where we miss bits out. For example where the film switches to the next day. However in 'Twelve Angry Men' this does not happen. We see all that happens, thus adding to the power of the drama. But if tension were to run all the time throughout the play it would become very boring. The tension has to have gaps between the start and the main part

Twelve Angry Men by Reginald Rose

695 words - 3 pages Twelve Angry Men by Reginald Rose The play "Twelve Angry Men", By Reginald Rose, is a play about 12 jurors that in an uncomfortable room have to discuss a life and death case about a boy that is accused or killing his father. the jurors do not really know eachother to talk to and wish they were anywhere but in that jury room. Every juror has a different emotional pattern that makes the play interesting. In my opinion there were 3 main

Twelve Angry Men: a critical review

2122 words - 8 pages them to change the minds of each and every person out there that disagrees with what they feel is right and pursue them to conform to their convictions.But in a realistic world, is that possible? Can one person change the minds of eleven others when what they feel and believe has already been set in stone and engraved on their hearts? Twelve Angry Men poses this question and provides an answer. And although it is obviously done with a Hollywood

Twelve Angry Men and the Jurors of The Kevorkian Trials

2347 words - 9 pages people carry out their death wishes; therefore, his solution was a suicide machine (Chermak 103). In this way, more than 130 were helped by Dr. Kevorkian and his suicide machine (Chua-Eoan). Although Kevorkian was tried five times, he was found innocent four times (Chermak 108-115). His jury had an onerous time coming to their conclusion. Throughout Twelve Angry Men, written by Reginald Rose, Twelve jurors had to decide the fate of one boy convicted

A Real Twelve Angry Men and Jerry Sandusky Trial

2236 words - 9 pages As a juror in any court case it would be difficult to come to one conclusion with twelve different opinions. The fictional play Twelve Angry Men proved this to be true, however, the jurors in the Sandusky trial found it relatively easy to decide on a verdict. Jerry Sandusky, former Penn State assistant football coach and founder of the 2nd Mile charity, was convicted of fifty-two accounts of child molestation. Although members of the jury would

A Real Twelve Angry Men and The Rodney King Trial

1900 words - 8 pages It was April 29th, 1992, and “Dawn was just filtering over Los Angeles and Courtroom 890 was silent as a tomb”(Mathews 1). The Rodney King trial had taken a little over two months and the verdict had the potential to change the history of the United States indefinitely. In both the Rodney King Beating Trial and the play Twelve Angry Men, racism played a major part in the original verdict. Rodney King was definitely in the wrong on the night of

Comparing and Contrasting Juror 3 and Juror 8 from Twelve Angry Men

1396 words - 6 pages In the play “Twelve Angry men”, the story line presents a variety of perspectives and opinions between twelve very different men. Some are more likely to be pointed out as prejudice, and others are more focused on reaching fair justice. Clearly, it is quite difficult for different people to vote ‘guilty’ or ‘not guilty’ in unity when coming to a fair decision. In all of the twelve jurors, I have chosen Juror 3 and Juror 8 for

The Factors Influencing the Way Each of the Members of the Jury Perceived the Murder in Twelve Angry Men

1214 words - 5 pages The Factors Influencing the Way Each of the Members of the Jury Perceived the Murder in Twelve Angry Men Each of the members of the jury perceived the murder according to their own beliefs, values and social status. As the story unfolds, reveals the jurors' complex personalities, preconceptions, backgrounds and interactions. The most important factors that influence perception is personality, learning and motivation

Similar Essays

Movie Analysis "Twelve Angry Men"

1745 words - 7 pages Movie Analysis Movie Analysis 1 Running head: Movie Analysis on Conflict in Groups Movie Analysis on Conflict in Groups "Twelve Angry Men" Movie Analysis 2 Group communication is the interaction of three or more individuals working together to achieve a common goal. As we know, groups, like the individual members, have different characteristics and concerns

Twelve Angry Men Essay

1149 words - 5 pages Introduction: The movie ?Twelve Angry Men? involves twelve men, all of different ages, chosen for jury duty. Their case, a young boy accused of killing his father. The jurors had to reach a unanimous decision based on whether the boy was innocent or guilty of murder. The twelve men were placed in a small jury room, located inside the courtroom, where it was very warm because of the weather outside. Upon entering the room, each jury member was

Twelve Angry Men Essay

818 words - 3 pages Put yourself on trial, where 11 jurors out of 12 vote guilty. Although you are innocent, and the one man in the jury who votes not guilty has reasonable doubt for your guilt. Your life is in twelve angry mens' hands. You can hardly defend yourself. It's up to the jurors to interpret the words in the testimonies to find the truth. In "Twelve Angry Men," by Reginald Rose the main factor's that create reasonable doubt for the jurors to look at were

Twelve Angry Men Essay

664 words - 3 pages Twelve Angry Men The jury in a trial is selected to examine certain facts and determine truth based only upon the evidence presented to them in court. It is assumed that the jurors will judge fairly and without any personal bias. In spite of this assumption people will be people and in some cases, logic and emotion will collide. An excellent example that shows precisely what I’m talking about is in the movie Twelve Angry Men. Twelve men who