Movie The Matrix And George Orwell's 1984

1798 words - 7 pages

Movie the Matrix and George Orwell's 1984

Neo was now surrounded by people just like him who were searching for answers as to what the Matrix is. As they were sitting around the table, Mouse turns to Neo and says, "To deny our impulses is to deny the very thing that makes us human." During the Agent Simulation Training with Morpheus, Neo follows his impulses and turns around to look at the woman in the red dress, Mouse's proud creation. Neo was only following his human instincts. Of course, Mouse's statement would only be true for all humans if we were actually allowed to have impulses. Winston Smith, in George Orwell's 1984, would certainly disagree with this notion of humans having impulses, and every one in Airstrip One, Oceania would not even know what an impulse is. Winston followed his impulses when he saw that creamy book at the window of a little junk shop on his way home from work one day. He had been stricken immediately by an overwhelming desire to possess it. And that's all an impulse is: a spontaneous incitement or a natural tendency usually other than rational. An impulse is a sudden emotion, usually uncontrollable and yet it had to be controlled. Winston follows his impulses and he buys the book. He then walks guiltily home because even with nothing written in it, that book was a compromising possession (9). But that simple act of purchasing an empty book could have caused him his life at that very moment. The citizens of Oceania are not allowed to have impulses and they were never taught what an impulse is to begin with. The Party could make it known that impulses of any kind are forbidden and will result to serving time in a forced labor camp or even death. The citizens of Oceania are denied the very thing that makes them human.

The Matrix and 1984, are both centered on a government, which has for the most part, society under its control. Each of these governments dictate how people lived their lives and made changes as they saw fit. The leaders of the Matrix are its creators, the machines, the Agents. The leaders of Oceania are the members of the Inner Party and the Thought Police. These leaders have pulled the same type of world over these people's eyes to blind them, to make them believe their truths. These people are their slaves, and the government has created a prison for these people's minds. The past was dead for both worlds, the future, however, is unimaginable. Nothing is their own except for the few cubic centimeters inside their skulls.

Both stories starts when the characters asks the forbidden question, "Has life always been like this, and is that all there is to it?" Winston seems alone in his quest for answers. He didn't have a figure like Morpheus waiting for him to provide him with answers. He had to wait until he was sure that O'Brien's political beliefs were not as perfect as he made them out to be. Winston wants to be sure that he could talk to O'Brien about the continuous Big Brother monologues...

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