Muslim Man, Muslim Woman Essay

891 words - 4 pages

Turbans, terrorists of 9/11, and men with multiple veiled wives; a common American viewpoint of people practicing the Islam religion lies on the foundation of stereotyping and the assumption that all Muslims observe radical proceedings. A recent emergence of interest in this ancient faith spawns from extremists flooding the news with bombings, intimidating threats, and the likes. As in many cases, no news is good news, and increased media attention drew the public eye toward what appears to be sectarian societies with outlandish and uncivilized ideals. Report after report documented oppressed women of the Middle East, blaming their religion for their lower stature in society. Images ...view middle of the document...

Therefore, people judge her for who she actually is.” She continues on that this woman deems herself as liberated and states, “She is no longer valued for something material such as her good looks or the shape of her body,”(Sher). In Farhad Kazemi’s “Gender, Identity, and Politics”, he comments on different meanings the hijab holds to different groups of people regionally. For example, Islamic women of Cairo, Egypt’s lower middle-class consider their veils as an opportunity to hold a position in workplaces largely monopolized by men all the while retaining their traditional family values (462). In order to resist authoritarian-style government, women of Egypt, Pre-Revolutionary Iran, and Turkey’s university campuses voluntarily don their hijabs as a symbol of their protest alongside their religious persona (462). Islamic followers of both genders are supposed to, “dress modestly in loose, non-transparent clothing and avoid situations that would put them alone with members of the opposite sex, or lead to temptations of misunderstandings,” (Beyond the Stereotypes). However, the Qur’an assigns both genders a dress code suggesting they protect their private parts in order to protect their purity (The Qur’an Translation, 24:30-31). The article “Women in Islam: Beyond the Stereotypes” presented by the World Association of Muslim Youth mentions that Muslims view women as the more attractive gender, and therefore women are required to wear scarves over their head. These same women forced into covering find great discontent with the exploitation of women in the western world (Beyond the Stereotypes). Their sacred text advocates for women to shroud themselves “in order to be known and not abused,” (Qur’an, 33:59), a concept which they...

Find Another Essay On Muslim Man, Muslim Woman

MUSLIM VS. RASTAFARIANS Islam interprets the relationship between a man

2288 words - 9 pages MUSLIM VS. RASTAFARIANS Islam interprets the relationship between a man and a woman as one, which should make many babies while living a peaceful existence. “...(God) has created men and women as company for one another, and so that they can reproduce and live in peace and serenity according to the commandments of Allah and the directions of his messenger.” On the other hand,“...(Rastafarians) view the position (of) women as a

Research Muslim attitudes toward woman as based on the Qur'an and as actually practiced in Muslim countries today

947 words - 4 pages in public life with the early Muslims, especially in times of emergencies. Women used to accompany the Muslim armies engaged in battles to nurse the wounded, prepare supplies, serve the warriors, and so on. They were not shut behind iron bars or considered worthless creatures and deprived of souls.The woman in the Islamic society was able to do anything a man was permitted to do, but she had two responsibilities that were of the utmost

Living Behind a White Lie as an Afghan-American Muslim woman

1097 words - 4 pages Living Behind a White LieI am an Afghan-American Muslim woman. Afghan woman are a minority of a minority. A very small percent of Afghan women have an education and don't get to be successful because the culture discourages independence for women. In fact, this happens not just in Afghanistan, but in the United States as well. In fact, it happens in my own family. My cousin has an arranged marriage and has been denied an education by her husband

The role of Woman in the Muslim religion as defined by the Quran (the Muslim's holy book)

701 words - 3 pages On November 11, 2002, 20 women in the Middle East were returned home after spending more than two years in jail simply for dating men outside of their pre-chosen rout. This is not an uncommon practice in many Muslim states, and many women are treated much harsher than this, some even being killed . The media has covered many stories like this, and many more go unreported. It is a major problem in Muslim countries, and rightly so Americans have a

Muslim Women Rights and Requirements

811 words - 4 pages :232)”. Both women and men can marry who they choose, as long as they have the other individuals consent. Also more of a right than a requirement for Muslim women, is the right to an education, just as much as a Muslim man is able to get an education. The Prophet Muhammad (peace and blessings be upon him) says, “Seeking knowledge is mandatory for every believer,” which is aimed at all followers of Islam, both male and female. A Muslim woman has the

Muslim Women

962 words - 4 pages covers the head and body. The ninth picture shows one man with a sword and a group of women with their hands tied. They are completely covered, including their eyes. The last picture shows a young girl with brown hair with a sign. The signs says “I can support women’s right with my clothes on.” Nine out of the ten pictures show a generalized image of Muslim women. Analysis: These pictures contain some sorts of inequality. Although

Muslim Women

1706 words - 7 pages -subject-of-women-in-islam-1.1248295 Smith, J. I. (n.d.). Islam and the Role of Women. Beliefnet. Retrieved November 17, 2013, from http://www.beliefnet.com/Faiths/Islam/2001/10/Islam-And-The-Role-Of-Women.aspx [Untitled image of a cartoon with a female in a bikini and a Muslim woman]. (n.d.). Retrieved November 25, 2013, from https://thebaochi.files.wordpress.com/2011/10/cartoon.jpg [Untitled image of a Muslim man with a quote]. (n.d

Life of a Muslim in the U.S. after 9/11

1030 words - 5 pages On September 11, 2001, since the terrorist attacks, many American Muslims have been stereotyped negatively in the United States. Salma, a Muslim woman, says that the way Muslims have been recognized in the media has played a big role in the antagonisms directed to her. “I don’t know how many time I heard my classmates accuse me of being al-Qaeda or a terrorist” (Mayton 2013). Salma, along with other Muslims, even after a decade, are still

Islam

1114 words - 4 pages purified to be “halal” or permissible under Islamic law. This cleansing ritual allows a Muslim woman to purify herself prior to offering prayers to Allah. After the purification process, several of the women dressed themselves in modest long sleeved dresses that reached the floor and covered their heads with the tudung or headscarf. According to Islam, this form of dress is to safeguard their modesty and decency, bliss and the moral ideals of

Muslim Women's Rights: Misunderstood

1144 words - 5 pages as he is the caretaker. Islam regards the man as the guard of the Muslim woman. It is the role of men to protect women, provide her food and fulfill her needs. On the other hand, the Muslim women have charge at home. It is their duty to take care children, household chores, and other matters. So there will be a balance between men and women’s duties. Prophet Muhammad (P.B.U.H) preaches to men to love their mothers, sisters, daughters and

Mohamed's Wives Roles

836 words - 3 pages that allowed Muhammad to leave the trading business and lead a contemplative religious life.She was the first person to accept Islam. She was a big part of the transformation of the 7th century Arabian society. The fact that first person to have accepted Islam is a woman and not a man has in itself a significance for the role of women in the venture of Islam. "The faith of this mature, wealthy women of high standing in the community must have

Similar Essays

Activism For The Muslim Woman Essay

1807 words - 7 pages like to change and some simply learn about it in depth. But they are always acutely familiar with their cause. They know what they want. One of the groups that need change to touch their lives is Muslim women. Historically, women were given equal rights under the Islamic rule. Allah has said in the Quran: “Whoever works righteousness, man or woman, and has Faith, verily, to him will We give a new Life, a life that is good and pure and We will

First Woman Leader Of A Muslim Nation

1448 words - 6 pages women’s suffrage in the U.S. were, for the most part, left unharmed. (Catt, 1923) In Muslim culture a woman who spoke against a man would be publicly shamed, and put to death. A woman’s place was to stand behind the men of her country, to do otherwise would condone death upon her and shame on her family. Bhutto was the first woman leader of a Muslim nation. Bhutto had been exiled many times during her reign. After her father’s death Bhutto was

Holding Back The Muslim Woman: Her Body, His Choice

1663 words - 7 pages with them without consent or willingness as rape, but instead saw it as them being good wives and good Muslim women for their husbands. The women are taught this mindset in schools and marriage classes to further solidify their relationships. These religious ideals have negative implications because they connect sexual availability and pleasing men to a woman’s personal identity. Therefore, if a woman refused to satisfy a man for any reason, she

Muslim Vs. Rastafarians Islam Interprets The Relationship Between A Man

2293 words - 9 pages MUSLIM VS. RASTAFARIANS Islam interprets the relationship between a man and a woman as one, which should make many babies while living a peaceful existence. “...(God) has created men and women as company for one another, and so that they can reproduce and live in peace and serenity according to the commandments of Allah and the directions of his messenger.” On the other hand,“...(Rastafarians) view the position (of) women as a (weak