This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Mussolini's Invasion Of Abyssinia As His Greatest Success In Foreign Policy In The Period 1922 38

1281 words - 5 pages

Mussolini's Invasion of Abyssinia as his Greatest Success in Foreign Policy in the Period 1922-38

I disagree with the above statement. It is my opinion that Mussolini's
involvement within Abyssinia was not his greatest foreign policy
success. At home, it brought him praise and merit - the movement of
Fascism was now more popular within Italy than ever before. Despite
this, his international reputation was damaged and his relationship
with Britain and France, and it could be argued that Abyssinia was the
"beginning of the end" for Mussolini.

The victory avenged the humiliating defeat that Italian forces
suffered at the hands of Abyssinian tribes in 1896 at Adowa - in
addition to this, the victory strengthened Italy's position within
Africa and expanded her colonies. Italy was now considered to be an
imperial power in Africa, just like Britain and France were. All of
these had been long-held aims of Italian Nationalists, and the
achievement brought Mussolini praise and adoration of the Italian
people. The Abyssinian success was seen by many to be Mussolini's
"finest hour" - by the time it ended, he was at the peak of his
popularity.

The campaign was seen within Italy as a dynamic success for Fascism,
and kept in line with the war-mongering, Fascist ideology. The victory
showed that the Italian army was formidable, and would not roll over
easily if faced with opposition by Europe's leading powers - Britain,
France and Germany.

There are a number of foreign policy successes prior to the invasion
of Abyssinia which could be seen to be more successful. As well as his
success with regards to the Corfu incident, where he forced the Greek
government to back down and pay compensation to Italy for the deaths
of 4 Italian workers working on Greek soil, his involvement in the
Locarno Treaty, Kellog-Briand Pact and the Stresa Front were
undoubtedly much more successful than the invasion of Abyssinia.

His participation at these conferences improved his standing in
Europe, and made him stand up and be counted as a serious, leading
statesman of Europe. At the Stresa Front, he was shown to be a strong
and brave leader in standing up to Nazi Germany for it's disobedience
of the terms of the Treaty of Versailles. This resilience and
determination to prevent the growth of Nazi Germany was again shown
when he attempted to prevent Anschluss between Germany and Austria.
After the assassination of Austrian leader Dolfuss, a close personal
friend of Mussolini's, Mussolini labelled Hitler a "horrible sexual
degenerate".

He gained enormous prestige from his participation - he also saw them
as fantastic propaganda opportunities and turned them into diplomatic
spectacles, often arriving by speedboat or flanked by a vast
entourage, giving him the impression of a powerful, influential
figure....

Find Another Essay On Mussolini's Invasion of Abyssinia as his Greatest Success in Foreign Policy in the Period 1922-38

To what extent can Hitler and his foreign policy be blamed for the outbreak of World War two?

1293 words - 5 pages remain neutral if a war was started so Hitler could attack Stalin if he wanted. This pact allowed Hitler to buy some time to rearm start the war and when he was ready he could fight a two-front war. These two nations also kept a secret clause which stated that they would invade Poland and split it in to use as a buffer zone.Hitler and his foreign policy were also a major factor to the outbreak of WWII. His aims where to expand Germany to gather

The Italian Invasion of Abyssinia Essay

1103 words - 4 pages was supposedly negotiating with the league to settle the dispute, while at the same time he was shipping his army to Africa- he was preparing for a full scale invasion of Abyssinia. At the beginning Britain and France refused to handle the situation seriously. They were desperate to stay on good term with Mussolini, he seemed to be their strongest ally against Hitler. They signed an agreement with him in early 1935 known as the “Stresa Pact

How far did the agreements made at Geneva mark a success for American foreign policy?

828 words - 3 pages 'completed a major forward stride of communism which might lead to the loss if Southeast Asia'. Thus the agreements at Geneva did not mark a success for the US in this sense nor as we will see later in their foreign policy.The agreements at Geneva were not followed unquestioningly. National elections to unite the country were not held, due to the interventions of outside powers such as the USA. In fact the US began the attempt to undermine the

The Successes and Failures of Mussolini's Domestic Policies in Italy Between 1922 and 1939

1606 words - 6 pages greatest sufferers from the economic depression, copied this type of policy when establishing America’s ‘New Deal’. Mussolini also took credit for electrifying 5,000km of railroad. He claimed it to be one of his greatest achievments and stated that all the trains now ran on time. In contrary of these economic and agricultural policies, Mussolini also encountered some failures within his policies. In a strive to increase

The Role of Business in Foreign Policy

1665 words - 7 pages Throughout the course of American history, business-related interests have played a predominant role in influencing foreign policy. Foreign policy determines how America conducts its relations with other countries. It is designed to further certain goals such as security and trade. More importantly foreign policy seeks to ensure America’s security and defense and its ability to protect America’s national interests around the world. National

To what extent does Italian Nationalism lead to the invasion of Abyssinia?

2443 words - 10 pages from communism held together with strong national unity. Italy had Eritrea as a colony until Mussolini felt threatened and thought Haile Selassie of Abyssinia (Ethiopia) was going to invade Eritrea. Prior to all of this in 1895, there was the First Italo-Abyssinian War where Italy had already won over Eritrea in the Treaty of Wichale. In the Italian version in Article XVII of the Treaty of Wichale made Rome Ethiopia's center of all foreign relation

Account for Stalin’s rise to power in the period 1922 to 1929

1740 words - 7 pages ; his relentless and ruthless drive for power built around an alliance of opportunism and a shrewd sense of strategy; and the political errors and failures of his rivals, particularly Trotsky, including a failure to comprehend the threat posed by Stalin or to form alliances to attack him. Ultimately, these rivals faded into obscurity leaving Stalin as the undisputed supreme Soviet leader.BIBLIOGRAPHYBirt, Raymond, 'Personality and Foreign Policy

The Detriment of US Foreign Policy in the Middle East

2939 words - 12 pages U.S; they have always shown a keen interest in the Middle East as they have to ensure the free flow of oil in the international market. America's consumption of Oil is quite high and thus even if they have to point fingers at the Middle East government and focus their foreign policy on them they will.AnalysisU.S Foreign Policy and IsraelThe US is extremely concerned about the security of Israel. This is based on three pillars, none of which is

The Power of 'Soft Power' in Cuban Foreign Policy

2476 words - 10 pages cooperation and prides itself on its unwillingness to interfere in the inner workings of another sovereign nation (Huish and Blue 2013). At its roots Cuban Foreign policy seeks to earn international influence through productive engagement rather than a show of military force. Even President Obama has acknowledged the success of Cuba’s effective employment of ‘Soft Power’ and suggested that the United States learn from their example at the 2009 Summit

To what extend did the 1922 strike achieve success both in the long and short terms?

1232 words - 5 pages . White workers were very satisfied with this progress. As the only skilled workers, they advanced their positions and grew closer to management. Whites had won their battle to keep high salaries and other luxuries in the workplace and as time passed grew to favour the concept of capitalism seeing as they were benefiting from the system.In summary, short-term results of the 1922 strike include the anti-Smuts movement, which led to the formation of

Decline Of America In Foreign Policy

1535 words - 6 pages Good paper, unique style, vey boring - all about foreign policy and the rise of America -Decline Of America In Foreign PolicyI. IntroductionA. Foreign Policy1. Foreign Policy2. Areas Foreign Policy Involves3. Is America On The Decline?II. America Is On The DeclineA. U.S. Foreign Policy Is Unsound And Ineffective1. Falling Behind As A World LeaderB. Our Policies Are Unsuccessful1. Loss Of American Powers2. Loss Of Allies TrustC. Military

Similar Essays

The Success Of Roosevelt's Foreign Policy

1141 words - 5 pages The Success of Roosevelt's Foreign Policy Roosevelt did many things in his foreign policy including: the building of the Panama Canal, the Spanish – American war. In this essay I will explain the failures and successes and then come up with a conclusion as to whether or not Roosevelt’s foreign policy was a success or failure. After Japan showed its strength against Russia the US became distrusting of them; as

Henry Vii Achieved The Aims Of His Foreign Policy. Comment

2180 words - 9 pages H enry VII thought an effective foreign policy was essential in the governing and security of the realm. Henry believed that a good foreign policy meant security, recognition and prosperity. Security: Henry thought it very important to prevent other powers from harbouring pretenders to the English throne. Recognition: the beginning of the new Tudor dynasty had to be accepted over seas. This gave Henry a secure position on his throne and the

Was Henry Vii's Foreign Policy A Success

1334 words - 5 pages HENRY'S FOREIGN POLICY- SUCCESS OR FAILUREIt is possible to argue that Henry's foreign policy was a success. Under his reign England faced no foreign invasions and, largely, he was able to protect and preserve the Tudor dynasty. However, any achievements he made in terms of military victories abroad were little and insignificant - the tiny villages of Tournai and Therouanne being the only territory captured- and overall cost much more than they

Was Henry Vii Foreign Policy A Success

1334 words - 5 pages HENRY'S FOREIGN POLICY- SUCCESS OR FAILUREIt is possible to argue that Henry's foreign policy was a success. Under his reign England faced no foreign invasions and, largely, he was able to protect and preserve the Tudor dynasty. However, any achievements he made in terms of military victories abroad were little and insignificant - the tiny villages of Tournai and Therouanne being the only territory captured- and overall cost much more than they