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My Immigration To The United States

813 words - 4 pages

Life changes in matter of seconds. Imagine waking up to news of moving to a different country as an innocent young child, leaving friends and family behind and moving to a country thousands of miles away. I can still remember how terrified I was of leaving my homeland and coming to a new, different environment. Going to a place where I had no friends or family was the hardest thing ever. My friends and family members were very upset and they were crying because I was leaving. I was trying to be strong and hold back my tears. I had no choice of staying or leaving because I was only 11 years old and I had to leave with my parents. They had to leave the country because they owned a clothing store and it was no longer performing like it used to. They wanted to leave Egypt and live the American dream. My life went through a complete change because I moved to a new country, had to adapt to a new culture, learn a new language.

After spending 11 years in Egypt, I moved to the United States, an environment that was completely different from the one I came from. However, Life goes on. My parents put me in school. The toughest part was transitioning to the new, unusual culture, specifically the way people dressed and talked. Throughout all of this I learned that even with all the differences, all people are similar in some ways.

When I arrived at school, I was very excited because I knew that in America the teachers do not hit the students like they do back home. On the other hand, I was scared that I wouldn't fit in and make any new friends. Surrounded by a new environment, everything seemed so scary. Most kids in school seemed to know each other, while I did not know anyone. Everything I saw and heard was new, people were different from what I was used to back home. The other students looked down upon me because they considered me to be a strange, unfamiliar foreigner. I sat quietly in class and tried not to look at, nor communicate with anyone. The others talked to each other while watching me and started to laugh because I was different, but I knew that in order to get through this change I had to be a strong,...

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