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My Opinion Of Faustus So Far Christopher Marlowe's "Dr Faustus"

671 words - 3 pages

My opinion of Faustus so far

Faustus is giving the appearance of an intelligent man; he comes from a background of developed schooling and has achieved much in his life, with his profession as a Doctor. At first he makes us believe that he wants to sell his soul to the devil in order to be able to help people world wide, to be able do something to make a difference in the world, something that would make him famous. He wants something to make his life mean something, so he wishes to sell his soul to the devil for anything he wishes, which ends up to be wishes for himself and not wishes for people who need help. So him and his two dark arts teachers, teach him how to sell his soul to the devil, which is when we meet the demon that we see most often with Faustus. Faustus' arrogance and ignorance will be his downfall; he has turned away from God, yet he says that he wants to be as powerful or more powerful than God himself.

Faustus wants to be able to control things around him, he wants to be able control nature and use necromancer magic's to raise the dead and other skills along those lines that come with the dark arts that he would be using when in contact with the demonic creatures. Faustus does regularly show doubt in what he is doing, but he never does repent for his sins so he continues on his path to being damned in hell for his acts against God. He gives the thought of an intelligent man, although the things that he is actually doing is just pain ridiculous, he shows no common sense when he is dealing with his soul, he seems to believe he wont be damned with the other souls, but he will be something like Lucifer's right hand man. Although he believes he as evil or powerful as Lucifer, he does not actually have more power than Lucifer because Lucifer cant give more...

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