Narrative Vs. Descriptive Writing Essay

1206 words - 5 pages

Narrative vs. Descriptive
There are many different types of writing styles that are used in everyday literature; in books and magazine articles, scholarly and academic journals. According to Essentials of College Writing, by C. M. Connell & K. Sole (2013), descriptive writing is “defined by painting pictures with words” (chapter 6.4, line 1), while narrative writing is described as “storytelling from the point of view of the narrator” (chapter 6.3, line 1). Narrative writing is more appealing considering the reader is drawn into the worlds created by the storyteller; since narrative writing has a plot descriptive writing has no time elements or chronological order to the writing.
Narrative writing
A narrative writing shares a sequence of events leading to a point, moral lesson, or idea that is gathered from the narrative to make the essay uniquely meaningful to the reader. Since narrative writing can be true to life or fantasies of the imagination, the unique art of creating different realities for the reader experience is quite entertaining to readers. Narrative writhing brings the readers into the world of the story teller by using creative, detail oriented event or an alternate reality the narrator wishes to express during the plot of the story. Narrative writing can be a short story or the length of a novel depending on how short or long the situation or argument of the story may be. Any well written narrative needs to have a well written plot; a sequence of events that unfold to hold the reader’s attention through the length of the story. It is important to have a plot to your story when writing a narrative paper; a sequence of events that unfold throughout the course of the story that creates drama and tension. The story needs to have creative tension that fuels the need to reveal the answers to questions the reader asks during the course of the story. Narrative writing tends to be written in a first person point of view. The narrator is attempting to bring the subject and the events to life in order for the reader to relate and share in the emotions and experiences the author is portraying in the writing. Another reason is narrative is appealing is the writing can be real or imaginary; the story can be relevant to the past, present, or even future events. In the narrative essay, “I want a wife” by Judy Brady (1971), writing written from a wife’s point of view in the 1970’s. In the essay the author describes her life as “belonging to that classification of people known as wives” (line 1). In that line she expresses her world as being a part of a “classification,” a group separate from another that is expected to perform in a certain way. The author describes what is expected of a wife, and how the women of her social group feels about the expectations put on women by their husbands. The author describes a long list of household chores and other expectations, along with keeping her husband satisfied no matter what her feelings about the...

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