Native American History Essay

2124 words - 8 pages

Popular culture has shaped our understanding and perception of Native American culture. From Disney to literature has given the picture of the “blood thirsty savage” of the beginning colonialism in the new world to the “Noble Savage,” a trait painted by non-native the West (Landsman and Lewis 184) and this has influenced many non native perceptions. What many outsiders do not see is the struggle Native American have on day to day bases. Each generation of Native American is on a struggle to keep their traditions alive, but to function in school and ultimately graduate.
The long history between Native American and Europeans are a strained and bloody one. For the time of Columbus’s subsequent visits to the new world, native culture has been under a microscope. They were viewed in a scope of inferiority that caused Europeans to think that they needed them to teach them the correct way of life (Landsman and Lewis 184). The want for goods soon characterized interaction with settlers and the want for a stable trading relationship, becoming more apparent with the French Trappers (“How the Land”). The French were able to integrate into the Native society and understand with great respect, while the British only saw economic relationships with marriage (“How the Land”). The history of Native American were from a biased prospective and preventing the true nature Native American to be evident among white settlers. Many of whom welcomed white settlements for the prospect of new trade post and trading goods (“How the Land”).
Through the hardship and perseverance the education systems us still a struggle that many native people still have today. It is the history of the education through boarding schools that causes distrust for the current education system (Landsman and Lewis 184). Many of the students who were taken away were traumatized and abused in these schools, while being separated from their families for years (Robertson). A more pressing matter is that of the history in the classroom. With the one sided history being instructed to Native students bring a message that “Their history does not matter,” alienation begins to form and all motivation soon leaves the students (Laura).
History class is not the only issue among students; the nation’s standardized test also leaves Native students behind their peers. Many questions are “Eurocentric and culturally bias” resulting in many students who have grown in a traditional customs unable to answer the questions (Robertson). Many school curricula does not build on the students strength of the student, it is only if the strength and skill is of the dominate culture that it will get attention (Landsman and Lewis 182).
Many native parents are reluctant for their children to be taught by non native teachers. The experiences through boarding schools has caused generation to have negative thought of formal education has influence current attitudes to today’s education system and teachers. Non native teachers...

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