Native Son: Analysis Of Rhetorical Strategies Max's Final Speech

511 words - 2 pages

Max concludes his argument for Bigger's life with a speech in a final attempt to persuade people to see the greater good in letting him live. His purpose is to convince that public as well as the judge that Bigger's violent nature is spawned from the oppressive society that keeps him and other African Americans in constant fear and poverty. He achieves success in articulating his points by employing various rhetorical strategies: similes, cause and effect, and comparison.
The speech is punctuated with similes. He uses them to relate Bigger and society to other parts of life. "The complex forces of society have isolated here for us a symbol, a test symbol. The prejudices of men have stained this symbol, like a germ stained for examination under the microscope." This simile shows how the white public looks down upon the African American population as a "germ" or plague of society, under constant interrogation and examination. Max extends this simile by relating society to a "sick social organism". He describes the "new form of life", the African American oppressed as "like a weed growing from under a stone", which expresses the immense burden of the white public. Max also illustrates the African American lifestyle as "gliding through our complex civilization like wailing ghosts; they spin like fiery planets lost from their orbits; they wither and die like trees ripped from native soil." This shows the aura of distress and hardship of the African Americans.
Max tries to explain that Bigger is the product of a racially oppressive society in which...

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