Native Song By Richard Wright Essay

977 words - 4 pages

Native son by Richard wright is a novel revolving around a young African American named bigger Thomas and his life working for the Daltons family. In a situation caught between faith and death, bigger must decide what he has to do to prove his innocence or fight after being caught in the midst of a violent act.
“He knew that the moment he allowed himself to feel to its fullness how he live the shame and misery of their lives, he would be swept out of himself with fear and despair.” This quote describes the situation bigger and his family are in. His fears and inner demons reminding him and fighting back of where his mind is really at. Wright uses this sentence to describe bigger and the ...view middle of the document...

He wanted to point out what they go through every day. In that it impacts a person and it all goes to psychological theme.
I think this theme fits well because he commits murder, and committing murder he reacts in saving himself; instinct. He acts what comes first to his mind, free, and on his own power. Courageous, and filled with will he acts on his own, to escape and survive. The psychological theme fits well with the novel, overall the actions and decision bigger comes face to face seem traumatic and helpless. I think wright using this theme is what made the novel interesting and a hit. He uses words of expressions, and detailed. In an interview he mentions that: “You fill your press with accounts of Negro crime. In the South, you use the Negro’s alleged criminality to prove that he can only be kept in order by extra- legal means, such as lynching and brutal segregation. Very well then, let us take one of the worst possible examples of Negro crime; let us examine the case; let us see who this criminal is; let us see whom he murdered and why; let us see what was his state of mind before he murdered and after. Let us see who were his friends, who persecuted him, who tried to help him before the murders, and who tried to help him afterwards.”
Clearly, wright expresses the purpose, the definitions, and the symbol for this novel. He challenges himself, the readers, and the characters of what is going to happen after he did this or that. The theme, thus seem psychological, acting on fear. It proves that wright intentionally want us readers/critics to think, think of what he is going to do next, or happen (psychologically).
The title native son, compliments the whole novel as one because it emphasizes him, bigger being born...

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