This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

Importance Of Water In The Awakening

1576 words - 6 pages

Importance of Water in The Awakening

 
    Kate Chopin's The Awakening begins set in Grande Isle which is the summer get-away for a few families of New Orleans "upper-class". It is a community of cottages owned by the Lebrun family. Edna Pontellier and her husband Leonce summer there with there two children. This is the setting where Edna also develops a close relationship with Robert Lebrun. He is one of Madame Lebrun's sons who helps her run the cottages for the Pontellier's and the Ratingnolle's. The book begins and ends with Edna and her attraction to the water. Throughout the story water plays a symbolic part in the unfolding of Edna and her relationship to Robert and also her awakening to a new outlook on life along with an independence that takes her away from her family and the socially constraining life in which she no longer can see herself a part of.

Edna and Robert are at the beach enjoying each others company at first. They quickly return to the cottage where Leonce is and he talks to them. They have had a good time down by the water and Leonce, being the proper business like man that he is does not understand why Robert would rather spend his time chatting with his wife than attending to other things. It is obvious to the reader that Edna and Robert have a connection and are amused with what the other has to say. Leonce shrugs this off as nothing and leaves for the hotel where many of the men chat and drink in the evenings. Edna and Robert talk some more and eventually part. These are the first signs of something special between them.

Robert often spends his time chatting with Edna and Madame Ratingnolle. Adele Ratingnolle is a lovely woman who Edna and Robert both adore for her beauty and portrait of womanhood. They are chatting and talking of Edna's painting outside of Adele's cottage. Edna is very passionate and critical of her painting. After Adele has a fainting spell from her long day and retires inside Robert invites Edna to join him on the beach to bathe in the heat. Edna looks toward the water and feels a draw to it. The water is a source of strength for Edna she follows Robert down to the welcoming Gulf. Edna can not understand why she wants to go with Robert down to the water nut she feels drawn and the conflicting impulses which would steer her away from the proposal seem to disappear. "Mrs. Pontellier was beginning to understand her position in the universe as a human being. Edna, up until now, had been going through the motions of being a wife, mother and woman in the society in which she has lived. The ocean to Edna is a place where she feels comfort and although she does not fully understand why she is drawn to it, she goes. She likes the way the water feels when she enters it with Robert. It is a new feeling for her.

Edna also finds comfort in spending time with Adele whom she adores. They spend some time together on the beach to escape Robert one time and...

Find Another Essay On Importance of Water in The Awakening

The Biological importance of water Essay

1460 words - 6 pages Water is essential to life itself, with out water life on earth would not exist. Water is a major component of cells, typically forming between 70 and 95% of the mass of the cell. This means that we are made from approximately 80% water by mass and some soft bodied creatures such as jellyfish are made of up to 96% water. Water also provides an environment for organisms to live in, 75% of the earth is covered in water.Water itself is a simple

The Importance of Bottled Water in the World

1126 words - 5 pages , this article will show you the importance of water bottles and how people around the world are so dependent on bottled water, although this does not affect you or me. For some people in third-world countries bottled water is a life-or-death necessity and they couldn’t survive without it. The Scholastic article, Is Bottled Water Really Better? brings up the startling statistic that throughout the world 780 million people do not have access to safe

Comparing the Importance of Water vs. Oil

773 words - 3 pages Water always has and always will have a fundamental role in the continuation of life on our planet. Oil however, has not. Crude oil has never been a necessity, but a luxury in our everyday lives. Water is more precious than oil. This can be shown through its variety of uses and its necessity in our lives and for our well being. Oil of course has many uses in our world but is not fundamental in the survival of life. The future for both oil

The Importance of Water on Earth

935 words - 4 pages All matter is made up of atoms and water is no exception. In order to shape molecules atoms either bond, or fuse together. To shape a water molecule, two atoms of hydrogen must bond to a single atom of oxygen. This results with the chemical composition of H2O. Water is an extremely unique substance because of its numerous special properties, the process of structuring a water molecule, and how they all act together. When a single oxygen atom is

Biological Importance of Water

620 words - 2 pages The Biological Importance of Water Water is a liquid that is colorless, transparent and odorless. It is one of the most important biological systems and it has many unique properties that make it essential to all life. Water exists in nature in all three states of matter (solid, liquid, gas), and it also covers 75% of the earth and composes roughly 78% of our body. Most of water's unique properties are a result of the hydrogen bonds between

Biological Importance of Water

1764 words - 7 pages Biological Importance of Water Water is essential to life itself, with out water life on earth would not exist. Water is a major component of cells, typically forming between 70 and 95% of the mass of the cell. This means that we are made from approximately 80% water by mass and some soft bodied creatures such as jellyfish are made of up to 96% water. Water also provides an environment for organisms to live in, 75

Use of Symbolism in Chopin’s The Awakening

744 words - 3 pages Use of Symbolism in Chopin’s The Awakening --Passage from Chapter X, pgs. 49-50 “But that night she was like the little tottering, stumbling, clutching child, who all of a sudden realizes its powers, and walks for the first time alone, boldly and with over-confidence. She could have shouted for joy. She did shout for joy, as with a sweeping stroke or two she lifted her body to the surface of the water. A feeling of exultation overtook her

Restrictions of Society in The Awakening

2015 words - 8 pages Edna Pontellier’s Struggle for Freedom in The Awakening by Kate Chopin In Kate Chopin’s novel, The Awakening, the constant boundaries and restrictions placed on Edna Pontellier by society will lead to her struggle for freedom and her ultimate suicide. Her husband Leonce Pontellier, the current women of society, and the Grand Isle make it evident that Edna is trapped in a patriarchal society. Despite these people, Edna has a need to be free

Theme of Isolation in The Awakening

855 words - 3 pages Theme of Isolation in The Awakening       One theme apparent in Kate Chopin's novel, The Awakening, is the consequence of solitude when independence is chosen over conformity. The novel's protagonist, Edna Pontellier, is faced with this consequence after she embarks on a journey of self-discovery. "As Edna's ability to express herself grows, the number of people who can understand her newfound language shrinks" (Ward 3). Edna's

Metamorphosis of Edna in "The Awakening"

788 words - 3 pages In "The Awakening", the protagonist Edna Pontellier undergoes a metamorphosis. She lives in conservative society, a society that restricts sexuality, especially for women of the time. Edna is bound by the confines of a loveless marriage, unfulfilled, unhappy, and closed in like a caged bird. During her summer at Grand Isle she is confronted with herself in her truest nature, and finds herself swept away by passion and love for someone she cannot

Use of Imagery in Chopin’s The Awakening

734 words - 3 pages Use of Imagery in Chopin’s The Awakening Several passages in The Awakening struck me because of their similar imagery—a bird, wings, and nudity. The first passage I looked at is in Chapter 9 where Edna Pontellier has a vision of a naked man “standing beside a desolate rock” (47) on a beach who is watching a bird fly away. This image was evoked by a one particular piece that Mme Ratignolle plays which Edna significantly calls “Solitude

Similar Essays

The Importance Of Setting In The Awakening

2249 words - 9 pages The Importance of Setting in The Awakening              Setting is a key element in Chopin's novel, The Awakening   To the novel's main character, Edna Pontellier, house is not home. Edna was not herself when enclosed behind the walls of the Pontellier mansion. Instead, she was another person entirely-- someone she would like to forget. Similarly, Edna takes on a different identity in her vacation setting in Grand Isle, in her independent

The Importance Of The Sea In Chopin’s The Awakening

2331 words - 9 pages The Importance of the Sea in Chopin’s The Awakening Unlike María Eugenia, Edna in Kate Chopin’s The Awakening chooses not to fill her family’s expectations. As she takes her final steps into the sea she thinks to herself: “they need not have thought that they could possess her, body and soul” (655). Edna treasures her autonomy and chooses death over familial subjugation. However her transformational journey, alluded to by the title of the

The Importance Of Water In Living Organisms

829 words - 3 pages Water has importance inside cells and externally. This may be because it has interesting chemical and physical properties; it can be found naturally in all three of its states. However its molecules are bonded together by hydrogen bonds, this raises its melting and boiling points, i.e. its boiling point would be -120ºC rather than 100ºC. Also because it contains slightly negatively charged oxygen atoms and slightly positively charged

The Biological Importance Of Water Essay

2014 words - 8 pages The Biological Importance of WaterWater is a simple molecule, made of hydrogen atoms and oxygen atoms in the ratio of 2:1, yet it is fundamental to life. In active living cells, two-thirds, or often more, of the area is occupied by water, and two-thirds of the globe is covered in water. Water is therefore extremely abundant, and in biological terms it has great importance both inside cells, and externally, for example as a habitat. Water is the