Nietzsche's Punishment And Guilt Essay

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When we talked about Nietzsche in class we discussed how a lot about the second essay, which is about Guilt and Punishment. Here are two quick overviews of what Nietzsche describes punishment and guilt as. Guilt is being accountable and responsible for the action you have done. You have guilt because you could have done something in the right direction instead. Nietzsche says that if free will is attached to accountability and responsibility then it cannot be connect with guilt. It is based off a debt that you have acquired and needs to be paid back. Punishment is dependent on the offender’s decision to act the way that they do. The reason this person deserves a punishment is because they have the ability to act differently off the start, they chose to act in the wrong and they have to take the punishment they get. Nietzsche says that if someone is not acting freely (accident, insanity, etc.) then they are seen as being exempt from punishment.
Below I attached two articles on the same story, the story is about a Medical Technician named David M. Kwiatkowski, who traveled to a few states and stole syringes of fentanyl. Then he would inject himself with the syringes and replace the fluid inside with saline and put them back to be used on patients. Kwiatkowski is infected by the Hepatitis C which made this one of the biggest outbreaks of the disease in recent decades. He was given a sentence of 39 years because of the impact of what he did and the many people it affected. Some facts from the article to know the extent of what happened are that 45 total people were infected by these syringes, and one of them has already died. Linda Ficken said in the trial to Mr. Kwiatkowski, “You handed down to us a potential death sentence.”
I think this story relates to Nietzsche’s second essay about guilt and punishment. I am going to start with punishment and how Mr. Kwiatkowski did something wrong and the people he wronged were looking for repayment. In the essay there is a line that says, “this anger is held in check and modified by the idea that every injury has its equivalent and can actually be paid back, even if it only through the pain of the culprit.” The group of...

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