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Nineteen Eighty Four And Animal Farm By George Orwell

1571 words - 6 pages

Totalitarian regimes have risen and fallen over the course of history, Nineteen Eighty-Four tells the story of a totalitarian regime that refuses to fall. Totalitarian is defined as “of or relating to a system of government that is centralized and dictatorial and requires complete subservience to the state” (www.oxfordonlinedictionnary.com). In other words, totalitarian is a form of government comprised of very select members who hold power over the population in a suppressive manner. Nineteen Eighty-Four is George Orwell’s way to inform the people of what the world will become if Josef Stalin is not removed from power. Orwell was born in 1903 and lived till 1950. Although having lived a short life of only forty-seven years, Orwell lived many experiences and worked several jobs. He received most of his attention for his works Nineteen Eighty-Four and Animal Farm. George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four is a key example of the theme of ‘the dangers of totalitarianism’ through it’s usage of violence, censorship, and intimidation as a means of control.

To begin, the party uses violence to keep the people under their control. Violence is defined as “behavior involving physical force intended to hurt, damage, or kill someone or something.” (www.oxfordonlinedictionnary.com). The population is too afraid of being beaten to step out of line. An example of violence being used as a means of control is present when the guard beats Bumstead in order to stop him from stepping out of line, “[...] at a signal from the officer, let free a frightful blow, with all the weight of his body behind it, full in the chinless man’s mouth. The force of it seemed almost to knock him clear of the floor. His body was flung across the cell and fetched up against the base of the lavatory seat.” (297). Bumstead was beaten simply for offering a piece of bread to the skull faced man, he followed his natural instinct to help another human in need and was violently punished for it. Another example of violence being used to control takes place during Winston’s torture sessions, “[...] a wave of pain flooded his body. It was a frightening pain, because he could not see what was happening, and he had the feeling that some mortal injury was being done to him. He did not know whether the thing was really happening, or whether the effect was electrically produced; but his body was being wrenched out of shape, the joints were being slowly torn apart.” (309). Winston is being tortured and put through agonizing pain in order to stop him from ever rebelling against the party again. A final example of violence in the novel is when Winston betrays Julia to save himself, “Do it to Julia! Do it to Julia! Not me! Julia! I don't care what you do to her. Tear her face off, strip her to the bones. Not me! Julia! Not me!” (362). The torture is so terrifying and excruciating that Winston betrays the one person he promised he never would. People will do anything to end the pain if it is severe enough...

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